Melodeon.net Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Welcome to the new melodeon.net forum

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Rosslyn Castle  (Read 3093 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

chas

  • Guest
Rosslyn Castle
« on: June 19, 2008, 11:28:23 PM »

Or however you spell it.  I've heard this played with and without the weird accidental towards the end of the first half.  Does anyone know where it's from and if there's a "definitive" version?  Or is this just da tradition at work? 
Logged

Pete Dunk

  • Typo Expert
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3233
Re: Rosslyn Castle
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2008, 07:31:55 AM »

There's an interesting discussion (and abc file) here where the tune is said to be Scottish.

The name rang a bell so I went searching on youtube for Danny Chapman's videos and found this. Here it's said to be English, might not even be the same tune but I haven't time to check it all out because I must get off to work. Even if it's not the same tune, enjoy Danny's wonderful playing.
Logged
Squeezing on the Isle of Oxney, UK
Primo D/G, Albrecht Custom Liliput D/G
Hohner B/E, B/C, C/F, Bb/Eb G/C/F
Liliputs D/G G scale, C/F, Bb/Eb

Bill Young

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1085
  • Paolo Soprani BCC#
    • Button Box Forum
Re: Rosslyn Castle
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2008, 09:09:10 AM »

Or however you spell it.  I've heard this played with and without the weird accidental towards the end of the first half.  Does anyone know where it's from and if there's a "definitive" version?  Or is this just da tradition at work? 

Rosslyn Castle seems to be the generally-accepted spelling today for the ruined castle on the banks of the River North Esk south of Edinburgh, near the village of Roslin, and a few hundred yards from the Roslin (or Rosslyn) Chapel of "The Da Vinci Code". A historical article here.

"Roslin Castle" is the spelling used for the tune (in Em) in the Taigh na Teud book "Fiddle Music of the Scottish Highlands, vols 5&6", and is also the spelling used by Sir Walter Scott in his novel "St Ronan's Well" (1824) when describing the playing of the fiddler Nathaniel Gow:


So the tune is probably at least 200 years old, and there's unlikely to be a definitive version, judging by all that discussion on The Session" site.

Old Leaky

  • Guest
Re: Rosslyn Castle
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2008, 11:51:50 AM »

Er, don't even mention that book in this context!  Reminds me of the tourist information board at  Inveraray stating "Mull of Kintyre...made famous by Paul McCartney..." (sic). Both were there long before popular culture (sic) put them on the map...
Logged

chas

  • Guest
Re: Rosslyn Castle
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2008, 07:54:10 PM »

Thanks.  But does the highland fiddle book use a D or an Eb at the crucial point?

Chas
Logged

Bill Young

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1085
  • Paolo Soprani BCC#
    • Button Box Forum
Re: Rosslyn Castle
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2008, 08:39:07 PM »

Thanks.  But does the highland fiddle book use a D or an Eb at the crucial point?

Chas

Not knowing the tune very well, I'm not sure what you mean by the "crucial point". However, there are a couple of D#s in there. If I've managed the attachment process, you should be able to see it.

Yes, it works!
« Last Edit: June 20, 2008, 08:40:40 PM by wgwy »
Logged

chas

  • Guest
Re: Rosslyn Castle
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2008, 05:29:38 PM »

Thanks - that's fantastic.  Mind you, it's different again.  I first learned it with all D naturals.  Then I heard Somerset melodeon wizz Steve Ricketts play it with D sharps on the crotchets in bars 6 and 14.  They stand out like a sore thumb (which is what I meant by "the crucial point" - those notes really jar).  The setting you've posted has all the Ds sharp.  More like the scale in classical music?  I'm spoilt for choice now!  I'm sure someone told me Tim van E. (Do we mention him on this forum?  I'm new here  ::) ) had recorded it with the Ds all natural but I haven't heard the recording.  I guess my next step is to register on the session site and see what they've had to say about it. 

It occurs to me that someone learning it by ear at some time may have noticed those really conspicuous D sharps but just assumed the others were natural.  Most of them are fairly inconspicuous passing notes anyway.  The tradition at work, as I said earlier.  Sorry - just waffling now.  Thanks again - help much appreciated.  Lovely Scott quotation too.  This tune's getting to be a bit of a holy grail for me - hey, maybe the Da Vinci Code reference isn't so far of the mark.

Chas

Chas
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 


Melodeon.net - (c) Theo Gibb; Clive Williams 2010. The access and use of this website and forum featuring these terms and conditions constitutes your acceptance of these terms and conditions.