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Discussions => General Discussion => Topic started by: playandteach on October 05, 2019, 05:35:05 PM

Title: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 05, 2019, 05:35:05 PM
I'm not picking up the box as much these days. Still following the forum, and playing every couple of weeks, but not finding either the TOTM inspiring or finding another reason to play. Clearly I don't play with anyone, and have other musical outlets - namely my job, but I want to be in some sort of melodeon shape to enjoy Wensleydale next spring.
Any tips on what to do to get back into it? I've written probably as many tunes as I'm going to have in my head.
I mainly play French style tunes on a GC 2 row, but also have a DG. I'm in the far north east of England.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Tiposx on October 05, 2019, 07:51:39 PM
Having a friend to play along with is a big incentive. Another fillip is to keep learning new tunes, or visit a pub session, if you can find one that plays your kind of music.
Also a change of instrument now and then eg to mandolin or concertina can help.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Winston Smith on October 05, 2019, 08:37:45 PM
"not finding either the TOTM inspiring or finding another reason to play"

Hi, P&T. We all have different reasons for wanting to play, mine is just that I enjoy trying to play tunes which I like. But, from what I've read of your journey on here, you seem to prefer the challenge of perfecting playing a new instrument and enjoying the sounds which you can get out of them.
I'm still happy to try knocking out tunes (you've heard my playing, haha!) so I'm still happy to just be able to do that. Whereas, since you have conquered the 4th apart system (yes, I've heard your playing, too!) it would seem that that challenge has been met, and you've now nowhere to go with the melodeon!
How about taking up another system, like the half-step boxes B/C, C#/D etc.? Being a proper musician, however, I'm sure that you'd soon overcome that challenge also, and then what? Perhaps you might develop an interest in playing for dance, or the Morris, I'm sure that there'd be an opportunity somewhere local for either of these melodeon music outlets.
Good luck, anyway, it would certainly be a shame if we were altogether deprived of your talent for lovely squeezebox playing!
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Squeaky Pete on October 05, 2019, 08:53:59 PM
There's a nice informal monthly session in the church tower in Corbridge. Sunday lunchtime and there's a micro brewery there.
Get along to that and just busk along. It'll do wonders for your playing by ear journey too. Play a party piece when it's your turn and everyone will support you.
It won't be French stuff but there'll be string people who will play in C with you
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Bob Ellis on October 05, 2019, 09:45:59 PM
For inspiring French music, you could do worse than visit the Festival des Panards at Todmorden next weekend (11 - 13 October). There will be some great music in the bals on Friday and Saturday night, a range of workshops on Saturday (including a melodeon workshop led by Pierre Marceau of Trio Morvan) and an opportunity to play in an informal bal on Sunday. More details can be found at http://www.frenchdanceleeds.co.uk/
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 05, 2019, 09:53:45 PM
There's a nice informal monthly session in the church tower in Corbridge. Sunday lunchtime and there's a micro brewery there.
Get along to that and just busk along. It'll do wonders for your playing by ear journey too. Play a party piece when it's your turn and everyone will support you.
Thanks, Pete. I know the Peal Tower, and you're right that I need to develop the ability (not so much to play by ear, but to remember what I've just played - although the ear stuff is ture too). I'll try to get along without a box to start with - although Sundays are never good days for me. No chance that I'll play a party piece though.

Winston, it might well be that a different box (more rows, more basses) could be an answer - though I have far from conquered what I have already.

Tiposx, I could pick up a guitar I suppose, as I'm very good mates with Stefan Sobell, and he'd lend me a stunning one, but that might take me on a long journey elsewhere. I already know from trying once before that the finger picking style would be the one to tempt me - and not barre chords or strumming in general. You are right that having an outlet - or like minded person to play with would make a difference. There is a village band here run by David Oliver, but the volume doesn't fit with tinnitus.

Bob, that looks great. Not enough notice for this time - other commitments (table tennis matches), but I'll keep an eye out for that sort of thing. Thanks.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Peadar on October 06, 2019, 12:31:38 AM
When the fun stops stop....as William Hill counsels those with a gambling addiction.

Take a break. Head for the hills. Buy an old & cheap 1 row, remember that when it was new it was the best and  almost certainly the only box the owner could afford.

Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Julian S on October 06, 2019, 04:12:47 PM
How to keep motivated - and not be disheartened or too self critical at apparent lack of progress in playing. My problem as well - when I stopped working I did wonder about learning another instrument but my Wife started learning violin and I realised that concentrating on improving my box playing would be less stressful all round !
 So I started going to more workshops, listening to a wider range of music, learned more French music, started a little French and Breton session with dancing as well. Sessions can be fun, but also can be fraught with problems and I really prefer playing in a small group where we can all hear each other and enjoy each others playing. And play more interesting and challenging tunes together.
I don't know much about your area, but maybe there are other musicians in your patch who might share your musical tastes - or might like to learn with you. The trio I play with grew out of playing for a newly formed Border Morris side (yep - Marmite stuff I know) but I would always say that playing for dancing is a great way of keeping motivated and also improving. After all, many of the tunes we play are fundamentally for dancing to !
I'm also interested P+T - any opportunities to use traditional music in your school? Or perhaps you would prefer to keep work and hobbies well separated. ::)

Finally, we're hoping to be having a few days in your area, P+T, in early November, and I gather that Trio Dhoore are playing nearby around then. For me, hearing great musicians play can be both disheartening (why can't I play like that ?) and reinvigorating (great new tunes to learn - whooppee !)

Julian



Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 06, 2019, 06:13:40 PM
Thanks, Julian
I'd forgotten about Trio Dhoore coming. I meant to buy tickets ages ago. We do have a folk group in school, they're good. They prefer to be self-governing at the moment, even turning down - perhaps not the wisest choice, but I've given them their heads - a really fine local fiddler to run the odd rehearsal. I think I'd mess up their self contained status if I played with them this year. I do think some sort of reason to play other than by myself might be an answer.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: arty on October 07, 2019, 01:37:26 PM
Hi Pete...thinking about your position at the moment and having read the replies so far, can I throw in my threepenneth?
When I think of you, I always think of a very experienced musician in the classical genre. I am wondering if it is the type of music that you are playing on your melodeon, the English Folk Music, the French Trad and Contemporary Folk Music, that is leaving you wanting and, as a result, losing enthusiasm. Please don’t take this too much to heart, I don’t want to cause hurt, but sometimes, listening to you play, is like listening to Pavarotti sing the Beatles. You can tell that his heart, his ingrained musicality is not really in it. His voice, his training, his delivery was just too sophisticated and He didn’t come alive until he was singing Puccini or some other demanding aria - then he came in to his own and touched us all with his incredible voice.
I was listening to this, this morning and I thought of you. I can imagine you making an absolutely fantastic job of this kind of music....you have the musical knowledge, the musical skills and most of all, you have the heart.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KAR7zEHGWIc

Could you not find music of this type, to duet with your flautist daughter? I can imagine that could be wonderful. Do you know a competent pianist to accompany you?

I hope you don’t mind my speaking my mind, it is meant to help, not injure. I just think that you should be thinking ‘Concerts’, not ‘Sessions’.

I notice that Pete at Acorn has a Castagnari One Row in D !
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 07, 2019, 05:03:29 PM
I know your comments are always well intentioned, no problem hearing your views. I do like the French stuff I've played otherwise I wouldn't have taken up the melodeon at all. I love Naragonia, and having workshops with them at Wensleydale was inspiring. As to whether it sounds like my heart isn't in it, isn't for me to say. I'm certainly no virtuoso for the concert scene though. I've wondered about a one row at times, but mainly to force my skills for two row playing. There are instruments I can play better if I just want to play. I think if I had the money for that one row, though, I'd trade in my other instruments and buy something like the GC Pariselle (although I don't actually know how that plays).
Thanks for the thoughts, I'll have a ponder.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: baz parkes on October 07, 2019, 05:15:39 PM
I don't know if it helps, but there seems to be something in the air at the moment.

Several of my box playing friends are going through the same thing, and I did a while ago.

Hopefully, like all things, it will pass... :|glug
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Winston Smith on October 07, 2019, 05:48:55 PM
"I've wondered about a one row at times"

If you fancy trying a 1 row for a bit, I've one or two which you could easily borrow.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: RogerT on October 07, 2019, 08:29:08 PM
Get along to a folk session. Play with other people. That’s the beat cure.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 07, 2019, 10:47:42 PM
If you fancy trying a 1 row for a bit, I've one or two which you could easily borrow.
I know you would happily. I won't hesitate to ask if I do. Thanks.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: David Summers on October 08, 2019, 10:57:26 AM
Hi P&T, think we've only chatted on one thread, but its clear you are an excellent musician.

To my mind whats key is that you enjoy yourself. So to my mind I say music away from work, where you can interact with people, and maybe pass on your knowledge.

Guess this then takes into whats the local music you can do, are there any local choirs, are there any local bands, is the style in anyone of them to your liking. Some will be more professional than others, so some you'll need no knowledge (e.g. if its a new instrument for you).

Trick is, just do it for the enjoyment. so if its not fun, then no point in doing it.

Take me for example, I'm usually a choral singer, in middle of the road choirs. So I can hold the tune, read the music, do the resonance, change voice, vibralto, etc ... But what has been fun recently is joining a local folk choir, who are completely amature, take anyone and teach by ear with generally fairly simple none complex tunes. This is huge fun, and music simple enough I can start doing my own arrangements for the choir, so even though the music is far simpler than I'm used to, its been hugely stimulating.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: fc diato on October 08, 2019, 12:27:13 PM
Code: [Select]
I think if I had the money for that one row, though, I'd trade in my other instruments and buy something like the GC Pariselle (although I don't actually know how that plays).
Having recently acquired a Pariselle, I can assure you that they are stunning.  Amazingly responsive, light-weight (compared to equivalent models of Italian manufacturers)… the possibilities of subtle control of dynamics is truly exciting – (not that I can master that).  I got my D/G box as a supplementary to my G/C Castagnari.  The Casta sits neglected:  The Pariselle is a Jaguar; the Casta feels like a Ford Focus.  My guess is that the 3-row that Theo has just advertised is about the best ‘bang for the buck’, or should I say 'Pound per box ratio', anybody could hope for.

On a different note, if I may, speculate a bit:  I have been struck by the way you approach learning the box with systematic discipline (and keep telling myself I should adopt a bit more of that).  Makes sense, since you are a music teacher. But do you sometimes put aside the teacher inside you?  The reason I ask is that I notice you seem to record pieces that seem precisely at your level, seeking to master something before moving on. And teaching us in the process, for which, thank you! But do you – behind the scenes – sometimes throw caution and pedagogy to the wind and attack pieces that are definitely ‘too hard’? Might it be one of the dangers of being a music teacher that the dreaming teenager who just thinks ‘wow, I wanna play that’ gets suppressed? For ex: you obviously liked Coudroy’s La Sourde and even transcribed the beginning of it.  Did you try it out?

Otherwise, I would say that what works for me in slumps is to move to pieces that are in a completely different style.  I also have a preference for the French waltzes, mazurkas, etc.  But after awhile, they feel a bit monotonous, and something completely different spices things up.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 08, 2019, 12:38:05 PM
Thanks both. I don't need a musical outlet, as I have lots, but you are right (David) that perhaps I need something outside of work.
Thanks for the review of Pariselles. I did try one I really liked in Witney, but then another that I didn't. No surprise of course, as they are individual things. As for most of us though, I'd have to sell what I've got to buy something different (which always causes problems). I quite like what I've got, but would like more options for harmonies etc.
I'd forgotten about La Sourde - and now can't find the transcription - did I do it by hand, or was it printed? Yes it is a great idea to try something far too hard.


Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: fc diato on October 08, 2019, 01:09:15 PM

La Sourde intro was a PDF ... here it is (I think ... can't tell if attachment works) .
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Squeaky Pete on October 08, 2019, 01:10:06 PM
Anything just beyond your comfort zone will help spark more ideas.
I remember when I was first learning I was playing the odd Morris tune for the dancers alongside the more experienced musicians. I did prefer to dance in those days.
The university team was organising a day tour and assumed I would be happy to play as I danced with them regularly. Come the day, I was the only musician and we had only one spare dancer. I ended up playing everything I even thought I knew.
Nothing went wrong that anyone would notice and I got to the end of the day thinking Wow! Did I do all that?
I went and learned all the possible tunes after that, half by ear, half by dots.
You are a very capable box player with a very precise style. Your expert musical knowledge is the foundation for all your arrangements and harmonies.
Yet there is a lot to be said for busking, getting some of it wrong, jogging along quietly at the back of a session.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: catty on October 08, 2019, 03:43:57 PM
I have a similar problem with boxes.  I enjoy playing, and they're fun, but not particularly musically inspiring.  The sound of a free reed, while pleasant enough, isn't the most interesting to me.  Yes, I'm spoiled - I grew up playing strings and woodwinds.

To illustrate - over on the accordion forum I cant relate as the population seem primarily interested in "classical" music, or standards, on accordion...which I cannot stand (on free reeds; I play Balkan or Brazilian or boogie-woogie).

So, i rarely play the box for myself, at home.  But I go every week to play at the homeless shelter.  It brings joy, and keeps my chops up reasonably well.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 08, 2019, 07:41:04 PM

La Sourde intro was a PDF ... here it is (I think ... can't tell if attachment works) .
Ah, no. That was a piece I wrote, having been inspired by La Sourde. Just a piece of counterpoint.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 08, 2019, 08:31:15 PM
Interestingly I just spent a while playing through that counterpoint piece, though of course I need a second player - catch 22. I don't want to spend the effort recording a part to a click track to play against. Then I grabbed some Telemann recorder music lying around, but very quickly ran out of notes. I could see myself really enjoying that, but I'd need a 3 row. I do still like the sound of my Serafini.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 08, 2019, 11:43:59 PM
Actually played a lot this evening trying out some solo line music, and then went back to some Naragonia stuff. Can anyone point me towards videos of more classical or solo line playing on melodeon? I think one of the issues for me is that I love subtle passing modulations which is limited on a 2 row.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Chris Brimley on October 09, 2019, 09:10:12 AM
Hmm - is the real reason for your 'anomie' that as a music teacher you simply find your box too limiting musically?  In which case, try one with more rows and basses.  Not only will working out its new possibilities give you enough scope for your imagination for decades, but also it will be inherently much more suitable for collaborations with other musicians.  I found out something interesting many years ago - if you want to play in a band, seek out the best players around of the instrument you'd like in the band.  Then approach them, and say to them, 'I'm starting a band, and I want a violin/singer/bass/crumhorn/piano/whatever player.  You're the best person I know, will you join the project?'  Human nature is such that they will invariably say yes!  What they will value most is your imagination in putting it together, your musical skills in putting together many of the arrangements, and your willingness to let them suggest music for your set.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: fc diato on October 09, 2019, 10:39:11 AM
Sorry about my La Sourde confusion. I obviously hadn’t tried it out (it’s in my growing ‘tunes to aspire to’ pile.)
Quote
classical or solo line playing
Do you mean something like this? (Benjamin Macke La Furstemberg, André Campra - 1697) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfSoG9BRDGA&fbclid=IwAR1K4gc_6EvGXm6IsN2Glu7wpNoy8hI5T5apA_F1kkKiuyRRf6f7HS60XzU
But definitely need the three rows there ….
Quote
I love subtle passing modulations which is limited on a 2 row.
Maybe you’re approaching something of an answer to your question?
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: arty on October 09, 2019, 01:21:38 PM
Have a look at this guy’s channel on YouTube, Pete. He seems to play a big range of music, Irish, Breton, Classical, Ancient. I particularly admire his use of the basses. I enjoy listening to him and his approach - it might offer some inspiration:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EFuk1zuF1oc

Reading more of your recent posts, I get the idea that you are going to need a 3 row instrument with 18 basses. I don’t see how a two and a half row would satisfy your hunger for long.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: catty on October 09, 2019, 03:08:36 PM
English concertina.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Jeremy Burnett on October 09, 2019, 03:13:20 PM
I have to ask. What is a "subtle passing modulation" ?
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: byteofthecherry on October 09, 2019, 04:10:49 PM
I have to ask. What is a "subtle passing modulation" ?

It's Jazz 'man'.. 8)
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 09, 2019, 06:28:52 PM
I have to ask. What is a "subtle passing modulation" ?
Just a quick wander through a different key, without establishing it as a new tonal centre, often moving on somewhere new or back again very quickly. Just a bit of sun peeking through the clouds.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 09, 2019, 06:31:59 PM
Have a look at this guy’s channel on YouTube, Pete. He seems to play a big range of music, Irish, Breton, Classical, Ancient. I particularly admire his use of the basses. I enjoy listening to him and his approach - it might offer some inspiration:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EFuk1zuF1oc
Thanks, Arty - looks right up my street. Funnily enough in Wensleydale, when I was brave enough to actually talk with Pascale Rubens, she said I 'needed' a 3 row. It was probably just because I knew where most of the notes were, though.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Jeremy Burnett on October 09, 2019, 07:49:20 PM
I have to ask. What is a "subtle passing modulation" ?
Just a quick wander through a different key, without establishing it as a new tonal centre, often moving on somewhere new or back again very quickly. Just a bit of sun peeking through the clouds.
P&T, very good. My Missis who knows about these things says you have it exactly right.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Guy on October 09, 2019, 11:14:13 PM
Unlike "syncopation", which a jazz player memorably described as "an unsteady movement from bar to bar". Or was that a Morris musician's description?
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Rob Lands on October 10, 2019, 10:35:42 AM
or altenatively a word I cannot spell like rythmn
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: David Summers on October 10, 2019, 11:07:04 AM
I have to ask. What is a "subtle passing modulation" ?
Just a quick wander through a different key, without establishing it as a new tonal centre, often moving on somewhere new or back again very quickly. Just a bit of sun peeking through the clouds.
An example that I love is Vashti Bunyan, Where I Like To Stand. Its mainly in C minor, but for short passages it moves up to Eb major (same key signature); and the change from the minor key to the major brings a change of mood for just short periods. The first verse has a very clean cut between the two keys, but in the second verse it takes a couple of bars to firmly establish in the major.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 18, 2019, 09:06:23 PM

I was listening to this, this morning and I thought of you.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KAR7zEHGWIc

Could you not find music of this type, to duet with your flautist daughter? I can imagine that could be wonderful. Do you know a competent pianist to accompany you?
Well, I've started playing again because someone has asked me to play background French music at a party. Which I can just about manage, if nobody is listening.
Then I thought I'd try your suggestion of playing some flute music. 2 problems, one is tinnitus is back, so I'm playing with ear plugs - but the second one is that very little of the music I picked up is possible on a 2 row. My box has accidentals at the bottom and in the middle, but the top octave doesn't have them. I may just decide to go to a bigger box, in the meantime can anyone suggest pieces (like the one I've just recorded quickly as an example - not to showcase my playing as it is a bit wooden here) that will fit on a 2 row. I'm happy transposing. I have a GC box with G sharp and C sharp Bb and Eb in the bottom and middle octaves only. I don't mind finding the odd alternative, but sometimes the chromatic note is the whole point. It doesn't have to be a slow piece either.
Telemann (https://youtu.be/Wr3AjSKjECI)
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: arty on October 29, 2019, 07:17:45 AM
Someone else recently discovered. Benjamin Macke - if you Google him, he has an interesting website.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=WfSoG9BRDGA
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 29, 2019, 10:09:23 AM
Yes he does, thanks for that - though I need more notes for most of the tunes.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Jackhumphreys on October 30, 2019, 08:29:31 AM
or altenatively a word I cannot spell like rythmn

With this mnemonic you will henceforward spell it right!
Rhythm Has Your Two Hips Moving.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Chris Rayner on October 30, 2019, 12:49:20 PM
Yes he does, thanks for that - though I need more notes for most of the tunes.

For this very reason I have recently started (at the age of 70, now 71) learning the chromatic button accordion.  I tried to get there with a three row G/C/Acc melodeon, but decided I should’ve started thirty years ago.  The CBA is much easier to play than it looks.  It’s also got four voices and a 120 stradella bass.  You do need to train with weights a bit.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 30, 2019, 02:23:15 PM
For this very reason I have recently started (at the age of 70, now 71) learning the chromatic button accordion.  I tried to get there with a three row G/C/Acc melodeon, but decided I should’ve started thirty years ago.  The CBA is much easier to play than it looks.  It’s also got four voices and a 120 stradella bass.  You do need to train with weights a bit.
No desire to go back to the big beasts, but I am interested in which GG Acc melodeon you had, and if you still have it?
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: xgx on October 30, 2019, 02:49:28 PM

No desire to go back to the big beasts (...)
CBAs
No need to go for the big beasts ... a 72 Bass, 5 Row with single and double reed couplers does the job and much less like the proverbial wardrobe on the chest  :)

... a three row Hohner Amati is also fairly lightweight and has a good sound ... for Hohner aficionados ;)

forget fanning, blow gently on the coals  ;D
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Chris Rayner on October 30, 2019, 05:32:11 PM
No desire to go back to the big beasts, but I am interested in which GG Acc melodeon you had, and if you still have it?

It’s a Castagnari Benny with 12 bass.  I’m probably going to p-ex it for another more suitable instrument shortly.  B. Loffet does a small 20 bass three row CBA.  The basses are arranged as 10 fundamentals with corresponding thirdless chords.  They go from Eflat to Fsharp.  It is quite light at 4kilos.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 30, 2019, 06:17:26 PM
What are you looking for instrument-wise. I'm seriously considering a 3 row GC.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Pete Dunk on October 31, 2019, 10:25:44 AM
or altenatively a word I cannot spell like rythmn

With this mnemonic you will henceforward spell it right!
Rhythm Has Your Two Hips Moving.

Brilliant!
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Chris Rayner on October 31, 2019, 11:03:03 AM
What are you looking for instrument-wise. I'm seriously considering a 3 row GC.

I assume you are talking to me.  If not please accept my apologies.

I’m carting a number of currently underused boxes up to Witney Supersqueeze.  Pete of Acorn has promised to bring a Castagnari CBA for me to have a go on.  If it meets my requirements then I shall attempt to do a deal with the Benny and any other boxes he’ll give me a decent price on.  Failing that it’s probably the Loffet P’tit Chroma.  Who knows?  I’m still on my pilgrimage to find the perfect instrument.  It seems to be slightly more elusive than the Holy Grail.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 31, 2019, 01:32:28 PM
Yes, Chris, I should have made it clear. Good luck with the CBA trial. You are a fair way from me, otherwise I'd ask to try your Benny out, but we are many hours apart. You don't have any videos of you playing the Benny do you?
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Chris Rayner on October 31, 2019, 06:31:21 PM
Yes, Chris, I should have made it clear. Good luck with the CBA trial. You are a fair way from me, otherwise I'd ask to try your Benny out, but we are many hours apart. You don't have any videos of you playing the Benny do you?

I fear not.  I have largely ceased to play it.  I’m not sure what you imagine you could learn from my somewhat hesitant and inexpert playing.  The sound of the instrument is pretty much what you might expect from a two voice Castagnari, fairly dry.  Although no doubt an expert fettler could make it more or less moist.  If you insist I could record something if you wish as a private exercise.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: playandteach on October 31, 2019, 06:59:31 PM
No insistence, but it would certainly help me. Any old thing showing the sound of the two hands (I like dry tuning, so it's not about the tuning but the core sound). Perhaps something slow rather than bouncy.
Title: Re: Fanning the flame
Post by: Chris Rayner on October 31, 2019, 09:39:11 PM
No insistence, but it would certainly help me. Any old thing showing the sound of the two hands (I like dry tuning, so it's not about the tuning but the core sound). Perhaps something slow rather than bouncy.

I’ll give it a go tomorrow.