Melodeon.net Forums

Discussions => Teaching and Learning => Topic started by: Squeaky Pete on February 14, 2020, 09:31:41 PM

Title: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Squeaky Pete on February 14, 2020, 09:31:41 PM
Not wishing to add my sporadic practice session to the 100 days thread, I thought I'd ask here.
As I said, I don't really do exercises but learning a tune with particular difficulties is quite challenging.
My Pariselle box has interesting reversals and the two extra bass buttons but I've not really explored how to take advantage yet. However I've found the sheet music for an interesting musette waltz (called musette waltz). It has chords marked and some indication of bass runs so I'm giving it a go.
It's driving me a bit mad but parts are making sense and the tricky bass does mostly follow the bellows direction of the accidentals.
I certainly don't think this warrants a soul baring video as I mull through it, but I'll post if starts to sound sensible.

Question is are you learning something for a similar reason, or just learning tunes you like?
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Lester on February 14, 2020, 09:34:35 PM
I only learn tunes I like or are required by by band/morris side, can't think of any other reason to learn a tune. Mind you sometimes I set off and learn a tune I love and end up hating it because of the effort.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: playandteach on February 14, 2020, 09:42:43 PM
Not wishing to add my sporadic practice session to the 100 days thread, I thought I'd ask here.
As I said, I don't really do exercises but learning a tune with particular difficulties is quite challenging.
My Pariselle box has interesting reversals and the two extra bass buttons but I've not really explored how to take advantage yet. However I've found the sheet music for an interesting musette waltz (called musette waltz). It has chords marked and some indication of bass runs so I'm giving it a go.
It's driving me a bit mad but parts are making sense and the tricky bass does mostly follow the bellows direction of the accidentals.
I certainly don't think this warrants a soul baring video as I mull through it, but I'll post if starts to sound sensible.

Question is are you learning something for a similar reason, or just learning tunes you like?
Is that the tune from La Boheme? And therefore also hinted at in RENT - great show?
I'm sticking with one row stuff at the moment, but haven't given up on learning some Baroque recorder stuff, should I ever get a 3 row.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Tone Dumb Greg on February 14, 2020, 10:11:19 PM
I'm working on Dave Shepherd's definitive setting of William Taylor's and Squeezy's setting of Sportsmsan's Hornpipes, because a friend wants to play the tunes and those are my favourite settings. These are pretty much consolidated and I'm working on making them fluent and firmly fixed in my mind and fingers. This is definitely going to run.

I am learning a children's song with a Gdor A part and a Gmaj B part, because I think it will make a good tune for a dance. The version I am working on is actually a Punk version. That's border morris for you. It is something of a challenge. There is a fair way to go. This is definitely going to be a runner, although it may have a short life.

I am working on this month's TOTM, I haven't worked out where it's going to go yet.
I am working on this month's Theme OTM. I haven't plumped on which one I am going for.
I am prepared to skip these if I can't get a resolution. I would prefer to do something, though.

FWIW
I don't practice exercises, such as scales.
I practice twiddles and things if I want to use them in something, but I like to keep things fairly simple, as a rule.

When stuff I am working on is starting to come together, I  record it, to hear what it really sounds like, rather than what my rose tinted ears think it sounds like.

If a tune comes to mind I tend to play it just for me.

I allocate about an hour a day.

Don't know if this is what is meant by practice. It's just learning stuff and playing for pleasure.


Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Graham Wood on February 14, 2020, 10:29:46 PM
I'm working on Farewell to Muirheads which is the current Tune of The Month. I'm trying to work it like the composers original so the key changes half way through. The original key change is F to Bb. My attempt will be D to G on a B/C box.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Tone Dumb Greg on February 14, 2020, 10:37:01 PM
I'm working on Farewell to Muirheads which is the current Tune of The Month. I'm trying to work it like the composers original so the key changes half way through. The original key change is F to Bb. My attempt will be D to G on a B/C box.

Funnily enough, I'm working on F to Bb on a CF box. It's going slowly. I may just settle for C to F, but I don't like to give in.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Squeaky Pete on February 14, 2020, 10:46:15 PM
After a lot of searching, I found it.
Amazingly I recognised it from my stumbling playing though obviously it should be played on a CBA.
https://youtu.be/oOw6WM3ntxg
Sounds far better than I expected.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Jesse Smith on February 14, 2020, 11:10:33 PM
I am working on "The Banks of the Dee" for this month's theme. Not too groundbreaking, but it is the first "double jig" structure I have learned, and not having any place to rest/coast for a bar has been a bit of a learning experience.

On that note, pretty much every tune I have learned over the past two years has had something big to teach me, so I haven't felt the need for exercises or practicing scales, etc. Some tunes teach me interesting left hand arrangements, some tunes teach me about crossing the rows for better harmony, some tunes have taught me to explore right-hand chords, some tunes have taught me about the upper octave. Hornpipes teach a very different rhythmic feel from jigs or reels. Minor tunes teach an entirely different orientation to the keyboard than major tunes. And so on.

My biggest issue is that I tend to spend all my practice time on the one tune that I am learning. And while this is working, both to learn the tune and to learn the techniques or elements of music theory highlighted by the tune, I worry that once I'm done with a tune it slips away again. (I started a thread about this a few weeks ago, about how to maintain repertoire.) I'd like to take the box out busking this summer and I'll need to figure out how to adjust my practice routine in order to build up and maintain an entire repertoire, not just a single tune at a time. I haven't really sorted it out yet.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: JohnAndy on February 15, 2020, 12:22:55 AM
I'm mostly re-learning tunes that I used to be able to play. That's because I recently got Mike Rowbotham to put in a Dutch Reversal on my Cheviot.

So it's a matter of getting my fingers and brain used to the new fingering patterns.

Tunes in G need most re-working, especially when using notes in around the range D5 - G5.

For example, I'm working on a set of three jigs: Fox and Geese, Captain Lanoe's Quick March, and Rogues' March.

And I've started trying to play scales (using a couple of different fingering patterns), arpeggios, and scales in thirds, all in the key of G, from bottom to top of the instrument and back. The idea is to try to finally fix in my brain where all the blasted notes on this instrument are to be found, so that when I hear in my mind any particular note that I'd like to play, I should just be able to go straight to it and make it happen!

Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Julian S on February 15, 2020, 07:37:20 AM
Looking at my file of 'current projects' I can honestly say that I am learning many tunes and even when I have played a tune in public several times, I question whether I have truly learned it - there is always room for change and improvement. Some remain half learned for years until I recall them, or think it would be good to add to the repertoire. I have become much more critical of my playing lately, and with some health problems, I suspect most tunes will never get to the desired level.
But the latest addition to the pile is Planxty Dermot Grogan, composed by Holly Geraghty. Much more likely to get played than Valhermeil which is at 'how the hell to play it!' stage...but looks like a good (and possibly madochistic) tune if only to attempt.

J
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Helena Handcart on February 15, 2020, 10:07:09 AM
I'm partly in the process of moving from 2 rows to 2.5 rows and re-learning stuff on my beautiful new old Salty but mostly I'm learning or refreshing session sets.  It's come to my notice that the tunes in our local open session have been getting kinda samey and as one of the more experienced session players I feel some responsibility for mixing it up a bit - without introducing tunes that the beginner/intermediate players who come along will find too challenging.

So far I have Ladies Pleasure/Webley Twizzle, Lumps of Plum Pudding/Swaggering Boney, The Gallant Hussar/The Valentine, Queen's Delight/Dearest Dickie, The Old Wife of Coverdale/Peacock Follows the Hen and this weekend I'm hoping to devote some time to The RSB/Seven Stars and Emma/En Avant Blonde - the last set we used to play years ago but I haven't heard it for a good while.


Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: malcolmbebb on February 15, 2020, 10:10:23 AM
So far I have Ladies Pleasure/Webley Twizzle, Lumps of Plum Pudding/Swaggering Boney, The Gallant Hussar/The Valentine, Queen's Delight/Dearest Dickie, The Old Wife of Coverdale/Peacock Follows the Hen and this weekend I'm hoping to devote some time to The RSB/Seven Stars and Emma/En Avant Blonde - the last set we used to play years ago but I haven't heard it for a good while.

And then after lunch...
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Helena Handcart on February 15, 2020, 10:21:27 AM
Oh yes, and the other stuff. I've got the Abbot's Bromley Horn Dance Tune pretty much learnt and the Papa Stour Sword Dance Tune that keeps coming back to haunt me, I keep messing about it with it, twiddling about with some likely basses and then wondering what I'm actually going to do with it.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Helena Handcart on February 15, 2020, 10:44:43 AM
And then after lunch...

Ah yes, after lunch I might get as far as actually having a shower and tidying the house up (a bit). The old man is away playing with swords  this weekend so then again I might not. Lunch itself might not happen.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: The Oul' Boy on February 15, 2020, 10:51:40 AM
Currently learning Seven Stars, which I noted on another thread seems to require quantum fingering. Also working on various other things in a less focussed way (e.g. Planxty Fanny Power, Rakes of mallow, Jack Robinson, Sportman's Hornpipe), which I'll put more effort into when I get to grips with Seven Stars. I'm also spending a lot of time trying to make tunes I know already better.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Little Eggy on February 15, 2020, 11:37:45 AM
Currently learning Seven Stars, which I noted on another thread seems to require quantum fingering. Also working on various other things in a less focussed way (e.g. Planxty Fanny Power, Rakes of mallow, Jack Robinson, Sportman's Hornpipe), which I'll put more effort into when I get to grips with Seven Stars. I'm also spending a lot of time trying to make tunes I know already better.

What is 'quantum fingering'?   I can't find any polkas or jigs written by Max Planck.   
But I've found this tune on YouTube and may try it at a future session.
It's called Quantum Theory Love Song

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61Ot_W4x4mU
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: baz parkes on February 15, 2020, 12:10:33 PM
Oh yes, and the other stuff. I've got the Abbot's Bromley Horn Dance Tune pretty much learnt

Yankee Doodle?  >:E :|glug
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: The Oul' Boy on February 15, 2020, 12:22:55 PM
What is 'quantum fingering'?   I can't find any polkas or jigs written by Max Planck.   
But I've found this tune on YouTube and may try it at a future session.
It's called Quantum Theory Love Song

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61Ot_W4x4mU

Thanks for the link! Quantum fingering = trying to have the same fingers in two places at the same time, or to move them faster than the speed of light (or at least faster than is comfortable for me) between different positions. Hopefully it will get easier...
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Helena Handcart on February 15, 2020, 12:41:39 PM
Thanks for the link! Quantum fingering = trying to have the same fingers in two places at the same time, or to move them faster than the speed of light (or at least faster than is comfortable for me) between different positions. Hopefully it will get easier...

You know, 'Seven Stars' is a lovely tune but if you're struggling with the fingering on a more complex version it is perfectly valid (and lovely) played mostly up and down the row. Certainly don't let struggling to get all the cross-rows you want in at once and at speed mar your enjoyment of learning a perfectly good tune.

For starters you can play most of the tune on the D row, maybe nipping over for the pull A to keep the A bass going at the end of the fourth bars of the A and B music and play the b-g-b runs in the fifth and sixth bars of the B music on the G row - and when you're comfortable with that you can work up to the rest.



Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: The Oul' Boy on February 15, 2020, 01:16:36 PM
You know, 'Seven Stars' is a lovely tune but if you're struggling with the fingering on a more complex version it is perfectly valid (and lovely) played mostly up and down the row. Certainly don't let struggling to get all the cross-rows you want in at once and at speed mar your enjoyment of learning a perfectly good tune.

For starters you can play most of the tune on the D row, maybe nipping over for the pull A to keep the A bass going at the end of the fourth bars of the A and B music and play the b-g-b runs in the fifth and sixth bars of the B music on the G row - and when you're comfortable with that you can work up to the rest.

Thanks Helena! But I'm trying to push myself, to learn more cross-rowing and more complex bass, so I shall persevere (not that it is in any way unpleasant, indeed trying harder stuff is half the fun!).
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: mselic on February 15, 2020, 01:28:21 PM
I only learn tunes I like or are required by by band/morris side, can't think of any other reason to learn a tune. Mind you sometimes I set off and learn a tune I love and end up hating it because of the effort.

Ha! Yes!
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Little Eggy on February 15, 2020, 01:56:11 PM
I learnt Moon and Seven Stars on a one row so I just play it up and down the D row now.
It's a bit rough but there we are ........ I pair it with Captain Lannoe's to get a lovely leap down to the G row.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Helena Handcart on February 15, 2020, 02:01:16 PM
I learnt Moon and Seven Stars on a one row so I just play it up and down the D row now.
It's a bit rough but there we are ........ I pair it with Captain Lannoe's to get a lovely leap down to the G row.

That's a pretty big leap from a one row in D  ;D

Round there 'ere parts Rogues' March goes with Captain Lanoe.  I'm going to pair the RSB with Seven Stars and introduce it into our local session as a set. 
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Peadar on February 15, 2020, 02:55:14 PM
Errrrr....Winster Gallop :|bl and The British Grenadiers  :|bl :|bl
and why?
'Cos the elves made me do itinspired me.

And for balance: Clare's Dragoons.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: The Oul' Boy on February 15, 2020, 02:58:38 PM
Errrrr....Winster Gallop :|bl and The British Grenadiers  :|bl :|bl
and why?
'Cos the elves made me do itinspired me.

Ha ha, both very pleasing tunes to play on the row.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Little Eggy on February 15, 2020, 03:30:54 PM
I learnt Moon and Seven Stars on a one row so I just play it up and down the D row now.
It's a bit rough but there we are ........ I pair it with Captain Lannoe's to get a lovely leap down to the G row.

That's a pretty big leap from a one row in D  ;D

Round there 'ere parts Rogues' March goes with Captain Lanoe.  I'm going to pair the RSB with Seven Stars and introduce it into our local session as a set.

2 mighty leaps - one from a one row in C to a D/G, playing along D row........and another from 7S in D to CL in G.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Joan Kureczka on February 17, 2020, 06:16:10 PM
Just finished getting down the "decorated" version of Au Bord, Mon Bel Enfant, and also been working on Ceci N'est Pas Une Valse in both the waltz and bourree versions. Now starting back on The RSB (and Helena, I like your suggestion of pairing it with Seven Stars).  Also want to start Mira, now that someone has shared the dots and Mel has done a video.

Need to also try composing a waltz or something for a friend's April wedding. Not sure we could take the time off to attend in person ( as it will be in the Lake District in April, at a time when we're remodeling a bathroom in San Francisco), but like the idea of a tune as a wedding present.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Helena Handcart on February 17, 2020, 06:20:51 PM
... but like the idea of a tune as a wedding present.

My first tune as a gift was a jig for the 60th birthday of a morris buddy who once turned up at Saddleworth Rushcart a week early - it's called 'Fruitless Trip to Uppermill' or 'Mr Pitts Folly' so if nothing else it's a good excuse to get creative with the title.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Alan Morley on February 18, 2020, 08:51:30 AM
I'm currently messing around with a version of 'Postman's Knock' and trying to jump my D/G melodeon into the key of 'C' via my computer DAW.
I don't sing too well, but in G I'm really struggling.

Also trying to learn to play bass guitar. I bought a Hofner violin bass a month ago. Short scale and easier to play for a guitarist.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Hugh Taylor on February 18, 2020, 10:58:58 AM
Learning Far Away in Bm, the tune by Pete Jung. Not very good in Bm so good practice. abc below if you want to have a go.
X:1
T: Far Away
C: Pete Jung
L: 1/8
M: 3/4
P:A6
Z: Phil Taylor from Jean Banwarth web site
K: Bm
P:A
"D"FA|:"Bm"B2 BA Bd|"F#m"cA F2 FA|"Bm"B2 BA Be|"A"c4 dc|
    "Bm"B2 BA Bd|"A"cB A2 de|1"D"fe d"A"c BA|"Bm"B2 BA "D"FA:|2"D"fe d"A"c BA|"Bm"B2 Bc de|
|:"D"f2 fe fa|"A"ec Ac de|"D"f2 fe fa|"A"e4 de|
"Bm"fd B"A"e cA|"G"dB Gd BG|1 "Bm"F2 B2 BA|B2 B"A"c de:|2 "Bm"F2 B2 BA|B6|
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: MikeK on February 18, 2020, 11:08:25 AM
Cruel is the Snow that Sweeps Glencoe and The Tay Boat Song The first one has been on my to do list for a couple of years.
 The version I learnt of the second one didn't fit in well with the words to the song,so I'm learning the version from The Sessions.org.
 in G
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: baz parkes on February 18, 2020, 01:56:15 PM
I'm still learning John K's Broken Rifle...
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Anahata on February 18, 2020, 02:38:54 PM
I've been working on Livet i Finnskogarna by Swedish accordionist Carl Jularbo, purely because two Swedish commenters on a YouTube video agreed that they'd like to hear me play it. (there's no accounting for taste....)
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Chris Ryall on February 18, 2020, 09:50:47 PM
otter in the water, Harvey Andrews, and John Tamms version of Manchester Rambler

Both are songs, the latter … quite a challenge in C
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: tirpous on February 19, 2020, 12:16:22 AM
 I know the notes, but trying to get up to speed on these 2: La grande gigue simple (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_fqA-EpBtU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_fqA-EpBtU) starts around 1:10) and The Morning Lark (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxFL9WN5J4I (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxFL9WN5J4I) first tune, mistakenly identified as Hardiman's Fancy).
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: LoonBox on February 19, 2020, 06:27:23 AM
I've been working on Livet i Finnskogarna by Swedish accordionist Carl Julabo, purely because two Swedish commenters on a YouTube video agreed that they'd like to hear me play it. (there's no accounting for taste....)

Me too, I'd like to hear you play it. Swedish commentators have the right idea. It was one of first tunes suggested to me to get a feel for how everything fits in the box. I've been working on this one trying to play it on the outside row then inside row and back again.  The third part shifts keys leading to my first foray into playing in F on the GC. Good practice for me but I need to let it settle in, and keep getting distracted by other tunes. Just spent a few days working out Yrsnö by Mats Eden. And I've got a few of yours I've been wanting to get at, Sir Sydney smiths march, Essex Bazurka and Drive the cold winter away.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Anahata on February 19, 2020, 07:48:43 AM
On a G/C, why not start in G, then third part is in C?
(I'm playing in D and G on a D/G. Why make life difficult?)
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Matt (Kings Norton) on February 19, 2020, 07:49:18 AM
Lark in the Morning, Haste to the Wedding, When Sick is it Tea you Want, to play for people I know at a social club thing and because I've got hold of an unusual semitone box with no left hand buttons.  The idea at the moment is a conveyorbelt of jigs where I start a new one every few weeks and keep going at the old ones, that's about as fast as I can go.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Anahata on February 19, 2020, 07:55:25 AM
Learning a new tune a week isn't bad going!
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Matt (Kings Norton) on February 19, 2020, 08:02:25 AM
Hi Anahata, if the last comment was for me then I wish I could learn a new one every few weeks, but if I start a new one I can work out where the notes are in a couple of weeks.  It will take much longer till they’re any good or even passable to play in front of friends.  So I’m going to come up against a time block soon where I can’t maintain the old ones and keep adding new ones.

A lot of people who come to these social club type events have a dozen or so songs or tunes that they gradually refine.  I’d be very happy to get to that point.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Anahata on February 19, 2020, 10:22:48 AM
Hi Anahata, if the last comment was for me then I wish I could learn a new one every few weeks,

Too early in the morning! I read it as one per week. And a new one... As you were, then.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: LoonBox on February 19, 2020, 12:25:09 PM
On a G/C, why not start in G, then third part is in C?
(I'm playing in D and G on a D/G. Why make life difficult?)

Just for fun and the challenge of it I guess.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Little Eggy on February 19, 2020, 01:07:35 PM
I am learning Ripple of the Teign which is on Bob Cann - Proper Job.  Hoping it will be good enough to video and post under Theme if the Month by end of Feb
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Anahata on February 20, 2020, 10:23:22 PM
I've been working on Livet i Finnskogarna by Swedish accordionist Carl Julabo, purely because two Swedish commenters on a YouTube video agreed that they'd like to hear me play it. (there's no accounting for taste....)
Me too, I'd like to hear you play it.

Here it is: Livet i Finnskogarna (https://youtu.be/EHk59iGC1tk)

I've also posted a link to it under recordings and videos.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Squeaky Pete on February 23, 2020, 07:38:58 PM
Sounds good, Anahata.

I've been putting in some serious work on this Musette Valse by Simonin and Esselin.
About half of it needs the bass in the opposite direction so it's a way of making me work on reversals. There's extra basses on this box that fit with my transcription too, so it's a good excuse to try them out.
Only one note fights me. In bar 15, there's a bass run that changes direction, but the RH note is long and I have to change to pull on the other row. At the moment, I'm just playing two notes, but I'm going to have to make something of it.
It's definitely a work in progress, but I feel it's getting there.
Link added, just for laughs.
https://youtu.be/eWAvHipZIBY
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Graham Wood on March 01, 2020, 08:54:00 PM
For the merry month of March the current TOTM Reel de St-Anne on a single row and I'm trying to figure out an arrangement for Last of The Mohicans for ThOTM on the B/C box. The latter will be interesting as it's in the minor key and has a melody played on top of a melody in parts so I might end up double tracking this one. It will probably sound a bu**ers muddle but it will definitely be fun trying especially as I can't play the box very well anyway. I think this will be a busy month....lol
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Stockaryd on March 01, 2020, 10:30:03 PM


Here it is: Livet i Finnskogarna (https://youtu.be/EHk59iGC1tk)

I've also posted a link to it under recordings and videos.
[/quote]



You play just fantastic. !   

As a swede I would never play "Livet i Finnskogarna"     :)

It was a serious controversy 1960 - 1970.!    Ten years!   
Who wrote "Life in Finnskogarna"? ?
Today you can read - trad. arr Karl Karlsson, Jularbo

Also try to play "Norska valsen"   It sounds almost the same.

Karl Karlsson =  Calle Jularbo   was  the master, made 1500 recordings.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Squeaky Pete on March 27, 2020, 11:09:57 PM
I've just uploaded my progress on the tune in the first post and now YouTube have suspended my account.
I can't see any other videos either.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Steve_freereeder on March 28, 2020, 12:11:01 AM
I've just uploaded my progress on the tune in the first post and now YouTube have suspended my account.
I can't see any other videos either.
That's a real pain - you should appeal the suspension. Youtube/Google moves in mysterious, and sometimes stupid, ways.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Lester on March 28, 2020, 07:41:05 AM
I've just uploaded my progress on the tune in the first post and now YouTube have suspended my account.
I can't see any other videos either.
That's a real pain - you should appeal the suspension. Youtube/Google moves in mysterious, and sometimes stupid, ways.
Yep, I'm currently on the naughty step for uploading a set of tunes, seems I was using spam or deceptive practices, appealed/asked for an explanation and received nothing useful.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Graham Wood on March 30, 2020, 08:07:13 PM
I've just uploaded my progress on the tune in the first post and now YouTube have suspended my account.
I can't see any other videos either.

It's a real pain when something we take for granted and have always done in the past, suddenly becomes the work of the devil and with no explanation. Unfortunately we rely on platforms that we have absolutely no control over. Tis the way of the world unless you become inventive and create your own path to glory........lol
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Dick Rees on March 30, 2020, 08:18:41 PM
Is Vimeo a viable alternative to YTube?
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Anahata on March 30, 2020, 11:28:58 PM
Vimeo is free to use if you upload less than 500Mb per week and 5GB total. After that you pay at various rates based on usage limits.
It's fine if all you want to do is post a link somewhere like here for others to follow.
It's not so good if you want hundreds of random people to find your videos, because far fewer people use it (viewers or uploaders)
But it's far nicer and less cluttered, and there are no adverts.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Corinto on March 31, 2020, 10:42:19 AM
New tunes I'm playing these days are "Mulher Rendeira" (easy) for my spouse (she is brazilian) and "Les Petits Poissons" (very easy) for my granddaughter (2 years old).
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Rob Lands on March 31, 2020, 10:55:00 AM
Currently taken with Bow Vow (alt Mr Kill Devil)  from Preston's collection of 1799. Interesting minor tune in 6/8.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: MikeK on March 31, 2020, 11:50:18 AM
Learning something completely different at the moment.  It's the  Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves. Everytime I hear Sam O'Doherty play this tune, it makes  want to dance around the house.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: arty on March 31, 2020, 12:03:22 PM
I am having an Andy Cutting binge at the moment...In Continental Mood (love this!), Flatworld and New Pneus. Keeping me busy! Keep safe everyone  (:)
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Tone Dumb Greg on March 31, 2020, 12:08:33 PM
From the sublime to the ridiculous. I am currently working on Lilly The Pink and Yellow Submarine.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: John MacKenzie (Cugiok) on March 31, 2020, 12:38:16 PM
Starry Night in Shetland
The Sloe
Michael Turner's Waltz.

SJ
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Lester on March 31, 2020, 12:41:10 PM
Various Fred Pigeon's
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Maggie on March 31, 2020, 10:04:35 PM
I am currently learning two Basque dance tunes: one is a Fandango and the other is an Arin Arin, which is danced after the Fandango.  I don’t know the titles of either of them.

I am learning to play repeated notes with two or three alternate fingers - the Fandango has groups of five repeats of the same note and the Arin Arin has groups of six and twelve!  They are both fast and the Arin Arin is quite stacato.

Being a left hander, my right hand is neither strong nor deft.  These tunes are challenging!

Maggie  :|||:

Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Bob Ellis on March 31, 2020, 11:36:43 PM
Konvulsionslaten, a lovely Swedish tune composed by Anders Norudde.

Plucking Raspberries, which I am told is of Norwegian origin, but I don't know anything about it other than that a friend of mine learnt it from a Norwegian fiddler who was visiting the Shetland Isles.

The Dales Minstrel, a tune I composed to celebrate the 19th century minstrels of the Yorkshire Dales such as Frank King, Billy Bolton and Willie Wrigley. Just because I composed it doesn't mean that I can remember it! I am having to work hard to commit it to muscle memory.For some reason, I have no difficulty singing it from memory, but find it more challenging to play it from memory. However, I am pleased with the tune, so it is worth the effort to learn it properly.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Martin Mickleburgh on April 02, 2020, 06:52:52 PM
Being a B/C noobie, I'm currently working my way through Bobby Gardiner's excellent tutor. This week I'm tackling reels for the first time - The Curragh Races, The Humours of Tulla and Crowley's reel, in Am, C and D respectively. The first two are presenting real challenges in that I just can't get through them without good use of the air button - long passages of C arpeggios with no chance of drawing a quick breath - and this is the real task for the week. I'm making reasonable progress but I can tell it will be a couple more weeks until I clan play them through at moderate speed with no fumbles. After that I will set about applying a few decorations to make the repeats a little different. Much slow, methodical work!
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Stiamh on April 02, 2020, 08:26:11 PM
Being a B/C noobie, I'm currently working my way through Bobby Gardiner's excellent tutor. This week I'm tackling reels for the first time - The Curragh Races, The Humours of Tulla and Crowley's reel, in Am, C and D respectively. The first two are presenting real challenges in that I just can't get through them without good use of the air button - long passages of C arpeggios with no chance of drawing a quick breath!

Actually there are quite a few places to grab a breath, Martin, you just have to find them. For example, in the B part of the Curragh Races, after the first bar and a half of C arpeggios you have a G arpeggio and you will find you'll be able to take in a good gulp of air during the first two draw notes (assuming Bobby Gardiner's setting is like the one I know).

Part of the problem you are experiencing is probably due to the fact that, as a beginner tackling reels, you are playing them much more slowly than normal, and hence using more air than you would need when playing at a reasonable tempo for a reel. Are you attempting reels too early, I wonder?

I think that beginners tend to use more air than they need to anyway - that's something that will improve naturally as you progress, but try to pay attention to it.

The second part of that tune is actually fairly well balanced in terms of air requirements. I just tried it without using the air button at all and found that I could get through it easily enough, with the bellows slightly more closed at the end than when I started.

The second part of Humours of Tulla also has convenient places to top up the air tank - particularly if you play the d-e-f sequence (possibly f-e-d) using the outer row e, giving you three notes on the draw.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Martin Mickleburgh on April 03, 2020, 01:08:34 PM
Being a B/C noobie, I'm currently working my way through Bobby Gardiner's excellent tutor. This week I'm tackling reels for the first time - The Curragh Races, The Humours of Tulla and Crowley's reel, in Am, C and D respectively. The first two are presenting real challenges in that I just can't get through them without good use of the air button - long passages of C arpeggios with no chance of drawing a quick breath!

Actually there are quite a few places to grab a breath, Martin, you just have to find them. For example, in the B part of the Curragh Races, after the first bar and a half of C arpeggios you have a G arpeggio and you will find you'll be able to take in a good gulp of air during the first two draw notes (assuming Bobby Gardiner's setting is like the one I know).

Part of the problem you are experiencing is probably due to the fact that, as a beginner tackling reels, you are playing them much more slowly than normal, and hence using more air than you would need when playing at a reasonable tempo for a reel. Are you attempting reels too early, I wonder?

I think that beginners tend to use more air than they need to anyway - that's something that will improve naturally as you progress, but try to pay attention to it.

The second part of that tune is actually fairly well balanced in terms of air requirements. I just tried it without using the air button at all and found that I could get through it easily enough, with the bellows slightly more closed at the end than when I started.

The second part of Humours of Tulla also has convenient places to top up the air tank - particularly if you play the d-e-f sequence (possibly f-e-d) using the outer row e, giving you three notes on the draw.

Many thanks for those valuable insights. I've applied your suggestions to Curragh and Tulla and, whilst getting the coordination really slick will take some time, I can see how they are going to work. One thing that has changed is that I have (already!!) succumbed to MAD and taken delivery of a lovely Serenellini 233. Quite apart from the smoother tone and the voicing options, one big difference to the Bouebe is that the air button is rather more progressive in its action...it's making a difference already, allowing me to concentrate more on not losing volume when I apply it. So many micro-sills to be acquired! It's just like learning to play the piano all over again (and the first time was sixty years ago).

I can see why so many melodeon players think so highly of MelNet when such useful advice is a mouse click away.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Tufty on April 06, 2020, 12:42:53 PM
Two tunes I have been working on for a while, especially now that I have lots of free time!
La Burette https://soundcloud.com/tuftyabc/la-burettewav
La Marguerite https://soundcloud.com/tuftyabc/la-margurittewav

Both very much work in progress, just the basic tune, variations will come later ... perhaps. I would be interested to hear if anyone else is doing these on D/G.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Dick Rees on April 06, 2020, 01:15:52 PM
Still soaking up Estonian music.  I love those 4 row boxes with the Heligonka basses.
And they wear cool hats.
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Dave Praties on April 06, 2020, 02:34:34 PM
Dick, I am really glad I read your post if only to discover the word "heligonka" and find that it really exists!!
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Dick Rees on April 06, 2020, 02:54:05 PM
Dick, I am really glad I read your post if only to discover the word "heligonka" and find that it really exists!!

I think it's short for "hellofagonka".
Title: Re: What tune are you learning.
Post by: Stephen D on April 06, 2020, 05:26:40 PM
Alio and The Rights of Man!
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal