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 1 
 on: Today at 11:32:42 AM 
Started by bonenfant - Last post by Theo
A fairly common cause of this sort of problem is badly fitted reed blocks.  They need to be a snug fit at both ends, and not have any warp on the base board so there is a good fit along the full length of the block, and with the vents in th blocks well aligned with the holes in the base board. Warped base boards are not uncommon on older Hohners.
You may well have just found the problem. I'll check. Thanks.

And believe me, the man who tuned it, knows what he does. I'm just looking for a bigger sound that's all.

If your man is on top of his game he should have noticed this type of problem.

 2 
 on: Today at 11:24:23 AM 
Started by bonenfant - Last post by triskel
A fairly common cause of this sort of problem is badly fitted reed blocks.  They need to be a snug fit at both ends, and not have any warp on the base board so there is a good fit along the full length of the block, and with the vents in th blocks well aligned with the holes in the base board. Warped base boards are not uncommon on older Hohners.
You may well have just found the problem. I'll check. Thanks.

That's why my number one question was "Have you tried putting the C#/D blocks into the B/C body, to see how they sound in that one?"

There may be nothing at all wrong with the reeds you've already got...

 3 
 on: Today at 11:12:25 AM 
Started by bonenfant - Last post by triskel
In fact I recently parted with a beautiful, top-quality, Binci-reeded, Cajun 4-stopper that was made for me...

That wouldn't be your Acadian by chance, would it??

Sadly, yes.

It was a wonderful instrument, but I've been getting more into vintage 2-row Italian button boxes the last few years and it wasn't getting used enough to justify keeping, whilst the Globe "Gold Medal" (though heading for 100 years old, and getting a bit fragile) will more than satisfy any urges I might have to play a 4-stopper - and it just goes to show how great those old Globe, Sterling, Monarch, etc. melodeons really were!

You can't keep them all!  :(

 4 
 on: Today at 10:44:51 AM 
Started by mselic - Last post by triskel
JShand on a melodeon....To be fair I can't quite see if this is a Double Ray or an Erica...but I assumed it was a DR.
https://youtu.be/OuphefLxUsM

No, it's a souped-up Erica in C#/D with (according to George Garside) "Italian reeds and Morino pallets". The tremolo does sound wider than normal for a 2-voice box, and must have been custom-tuned in Scotland for him.

 5 
 on: Today at 10:38:41 AM 
Started by Boronkee - Last post by nigelr
What's your approach to systolic melodies?

It's Ok as long as you have your heart in the music
Does this mean that chords that are very dissonant have hypertension?

 6 
 on: Today at 10:19:26 AM 
Started by Boronkee - Last post by Lester
What's your approach to systolic melodies?

It's Ok as long as you have your heart in the music

 7 
 on: Today at 10:15:16 AM 
Started by Boronkee - Last post by playandteach
What's your approach to systolic melodies?

 8 
 on: Today at 09:45:29 AM 
Started by Angienever - Last post by Chris Ryall
In this day and age, they should offer a digital version so avoiding shipping costs.

They wrote the books about 15 years back - then did their print run.   I suspect digitalising would be awkward and .. not increase income.     

Do consider getting 2+3 together, if that is you plan. Postage will probably be the same. You might also consider St├ęphane's teaching videos - on the mustradem site. I think he has posted all the 1st year now (10 per year).  You subscribe in compete years. Eu70 for the year.  English subtitles.  You'd want to be playing a G/C, ideally with a helper row, but most of it is on the main rows and he offers ways to 'fudge' otherwise.   

  http://mustradem.com/boutique/en/accordeon-diatonique/164-videos-pedagogiques-accordeon-diatonique-saison-1-complete.html

 9 
 on: Today at 09:38:28 AM 
Started by mselic - Last post by RogerT
JShand on a melodeon....To be fair I can't quite see if this is a Double Ray or an Erica...but I assumed it was a DR.
https://youtu.be/OuphefLxUsM

 10 
 on: Today at 09:37:47 AM 
Started by Boronkee - Last post by Chris Ryall
 I always get the chords running on the left end first.  Melodeons are very shrewdly laid out, and for most straightforward, diastolic melodies the right hand fingering will then come right automatically indeed magically! 

It helps to sing or  hum the melody as you do this. Once a chord pattern is there, I add the right end against it.  If the note is 'wrong direction' then ... you can substitute pull Dm for push F. Bb chord is in both directions. For C tunes and you will often move across to the F row in any case  -  experiment with this rather than a stick to the outer row.

Others use a right hand first approach, but if you do this you may work out some very elegant fingering only to find that the necessary chords are just not there  - ie in the wrong direction

In your choice of cords, do not be  afraid to pick one that is in 'tension' against the song.  Tension/relaxation is part of the essence of musical arrangement.  Similarly a drone Bb can come in handy - it works both directions.  Have fun  (:)

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