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Author Topic: THIRDS and SIXTHS - John Kirkpatrick DVD  (Read 8596 times)

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Dazbo

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Re: THIRDS and SIXTHS - John Kirkpatrick DVD
« Reply #20 on: October 29, 2008, 11:32:07 AM »

This is what Wikipedia* has to say (amongst much other stuff on intervals) which is of relevence here I think:

An interval may be inverted, by raising the lower pitch an octave, or lowering the upper pitch an octave (though it is less usual to speak of inverting unisons or octaves). For example, the fourth between a lower C and a higher F may be inverted to make a fifth, with a lower F and a higher C



*So it must be true ;D but this quote sounds very much what I learnt eons ago

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John C

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Re: THIRDS and SIXTHS - John Kirkpatrick DVD
« Reply #21 on: October 29, 2008, 06:26:09 PM »

Wow!  I really appreciate the responses but I think this is probably like asking "how long is a piece of string" but its given me food for thought and has actually helped me.   I live in Quebec where most speak French and as an old Brit I don't always fully understand whats going on but somehow I muddle through and things turn out ok - so this is somehow similar, the explanations differ but somehow I'm getting a sense of what its all about.
Thanks again
John

 
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Pete Dunk

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Re: THIRDS and SIXTHS - John Kirkpatrick DVD
« Reply #22 on: October 29, 2008, 11:33:20 PM »

PS. Instead of saying the 6th below the root why not say the 3rd octave below...

My thoughts exactly but my other half is a classically trained musician with a deep understanding of musical theory and tells me this is quite simply wrong and the assumption will sooner or later lead you into greater difficulties. She then wanders off with a backward glance of great superiority that you know will eventually turn into a well deserved 'I told you so!'

The fact that I don't really understand is no defence; she has tried to explain but there's a void between my knowledge level and true comprehension...  :(
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Falseknight

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Re: THIRDS and SIXTHS - John Kirkpatrick DVD
« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2008, 08:38:04 AM »

The reason why this area has got a number of people wound up is the because the third (and it's enharmonic the sixth) determine the harmonic colour of a chord.  More than a few of you have stops on your base chords to pull out the thirds so you can play in a wider range of minor and major keys without sounding excessively dischordant.

You can use the perfect intervals (fourths, fifths, octaves) interchangeably, but the third sets the colour of the chord and has got to be right.
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george garside

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Re: THIRDS and SIXTHS - John Kirkpatrick DVD
« Reply #24 on: October 30, 2008, 09:31:44 AM »


You can use the perfect intervals (fourths, fifths, octaves) interchangeably, but the third sets the colour of the chord and has got to be right.

which brings us back to 'if it slounds right it  is right!'

george ::)
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risto

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Re: THIRDS and SIXTHS - John Kirkpatrick DVD
« Reply #25 on: October 31, 2008, 12:50:20 AM »

Quote

My thoughts exactly but my other half is a classically trained musician with a deep understanding of musical theory and tells me this is quite simply wrong and the assumption will sooner or later lead you into greater difficulties. She then wanders off with a backward glance of great superiority that you know will eventually turn into a well deserved 'I told you so!'

The fact that I don't really understand is no defence; she has tried to explain but there's a void between my knowledge level and true comprehension...  :(

Gee, I am also classically trained, I would be glad to hear what made her say so.
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Simon

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Re: THIRDS and SIXTHS - John Kirkpatrick DVD
« Reply #26 on: October 31, 2008, 12:07:52 PM »

Yeah, start talking that way to someone who just starts to learn chords and chord theory basics and you will get him totally confused.
I know.. that's why I added you should just press the button below.  ;)

PS. Instead of saying the 6th below the root why not say the 3rd octave below...
For theoretical purposes it's more convenient calling it a 6th below. After all the distance between the notes is a 6th, which also sounds as a 6th, not as a 3rd.

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Falseknight

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Re: THIRDS and SIXTHS - John Kirkpatrick DVD
« Reply #27 on: October 31, 2008, 01:24:12 PM »

Trouble is, you are thinking in terms of diatonic scales as realised on single row push pull instruments.

if you have come to this from frets, or piano, where you have all 12 degrees of the scale immediately available, if you are playing chromatic two rows, or if you are playing systems or music that require extensive cross rowing, it is not that simple and you have to consider the degree (major, minor, diminished) of the interval as well.  Not all the music played on melodeons is harmonically simple, or in "easy" modes.
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