Melodeon.net Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Welcome to the new melodeon.net forum

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American  (Read 5311 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

finnhorse

  • Guest
anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« on: November 02, 2008, 12:18:44 PM »

I'm wondering if anyone else in the forum listens to box music from countries outside France, Britain, or the USA and could make a recommendation.  I'd like to find some recordings of music from other countries to see how those people are using various systems, and maybe pick or adapt up a few tunes.  After following the Club topic in the Teaching and Learning forum, it struck me how versatile the instrument could be, and how limited I make myself by virtue of what I listen to.  I started learning standards recently, and have broadened my playing with the more common waltzes.  Also took to listening to some old Schrammel (which isn't necessarily diatonic), but outside of that I really don't know where to look for diatonic box music in other styles. 

Austrian, Dutch, Japanese, Czech, Patagonian, Norwegian, Cubano, whatever... in a million sub-genres of rock and roll or Anglo folk music I could find a starting point to steer someone in the right direction.  But I'm totally lost here... all suggestions welcome.

____________________________________________

edit:  I feel *almost* totally lost.  I'm crawling some of the earlier pages in the mel.net Recordings and Videos forum and there are good youtube links.  I guess what I'm looking for are direct recommendations of CD's or LP's that anyone here could recall off-hand.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2008, 12:37:54 PM by finnhorse »
Logged

Québécois

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1164
  • Accordez-vous donc, c'est si beau, l'accordéon!
« Last Edit: November 02, 2008, 04:23:24 PM by qubcois »
Logged
Hohner Morgane D/G, pre-Erica Hohner in C/F, HA112 in C,
riced-up de-branded Ariette, Hohner Erica A/D

squeezebox63

  • Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 42
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2008, 01:24:02 PM »

How about some scandinavian tunes, schottises, hambos, polskas. snoas etc. how about some slow aires.
 Cliff.
Logged

finnhorse

  • Guest
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2008, 09:57:23 AM »

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/gramophone/m2-9000-e.html

Cool website, thank you.   I'm crawling the page right now downloading sound files.
     
    ...I thought there might be a few more responses here, actually.   :P  Does everyone perusing the forum really not have any ideas?  I own a heap of folk records, but none from Germany or Scandinavia, South America or Eastern Europe.  There's got to be thousands of people playing the box outside of America and Britain.

I found a few online catalogs of Scandinavian music, but I'm continually confounded by a lack of Swedish language skills..  ??? 


Logged

May

  • Regular debater
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 158
    • carolineshipsey.co.uk
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2008, 10:32:34 AM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtphYbI5m_g&feature=related

This link will also take you to more scandinavian stuff
Logged

Theo

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 11049
  • Hohner Club Too
    • The Box Place
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2008, 11:34:54 AM »

     
    ...I thought there might be a few more responses here, actually.   :P  Does everyone perusing the forum really not have any ideas?  I own a heap of folk records, but none from Germany or Scandinavia, South America or Eastern Europe.  There's got to be thousands of people playing the box outside of America and Britain.

I found a few online catalogs of Scandinavian music, but I'm continually confounded by a lack of Swedish language skills..  ??? 

Have you checked the video links over on the main melodeon.net pages?

There are links to a few genres outside the common ones you mentioned, eg Basque, Slovenian, Italian, Swiss
Logged
Theo Gibb - Gateshead UK

Proprietor of The Box Place for melodeon and concertina sales and service.
Follow me on Twitter and Facebook for stock updates.

Dazbo

  • Mods and volunteers
  • Respected Sage
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 365
  • Danger MAD Here!
    • My YouTube Channel for melodeons, morris and folk in general
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2008, 12:23:14 PM »

As Theo said there's examples of other countries' styles on the Video links page, if you find any crackers in your searches let me know and I add them.

You'll find plenty of Italian playing if you search youtube for organetto.

A good site for all sorts of CDs (and for ideas to seach the web on)is http://www.felmay.it/?lang=en.  If you search the site by labels Ethnica has some excellent modern field recordings from Italy, unfortunately I don't think they have clips you can listen to.
Logged
Ciao Bellow

Darren

Simon W

  • Regular debater
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 182
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2008, 01:58:52 PM »

I feel *almost* totally lost.  I'm crawling some of the earlier pages in the mel.net Recordings and Videos forum and there are good youtube links.  I guess what I'm looking for are direct recommendations of CD's or LP's that anyone here could recall off-hand.

Well a good place to have a look is here
http://www.cuberoots.com/shop.php - One of the hot countries for melodeon/diatonic accordion at the moment is Belgium players like Wim Claeys and Didier Laloy (look for a CD called Tref) I saw Wim at the weekend in Bath and he's a very talented player. If you want Scandinavian music some suggestions are Mats Eden (particularly his CD Avtryck) and Erik Pekkari from Sweden and the wonderful Markku Lepisto from Finland. I don't know of any Norwegian players but I'm sure there are. There is a flourishing scene in Denmark but Lars may be better placed to advise on names. The only Dutch players I know are Franz Tromp and Geert van Ourdink(sp?) but there are a lot of Dutch players mainly in CF
Also in Europe there is a distinct tradition in the Basque Region - the foremost exponent is Kepa Junkera but Cube Roots has some basque compilations ( it's called trikitixa there)
There's Italy which has several distinct traditions and styles of playing best known name is Riccardo Tesi - get his solo CD on Cinq Planetes but you can find out more here. Get his solo CD on Cinq Planetes.
http://www.organetto.it/
And then there's South America where there's a tradition in Colombia called Vallenato which uses the button accordion as well as Brazil with Forro Compliation CDs are available of this type of music.
Africa's most famous one row player was Idi Amin (it's true) but I don't think there are any recordings by him.
If you go here and look at all the links
http://www.accordionlinks.com/
you will find loads of references to loads of artists and styles - much of it relates to the PA but there is also a pile of information on melodeon/button accordion players and styles - much time can be profitable wasted browsing through.
Happy Hunting

Simon
Logged

EeeJay

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 642
  • Old Grey Paolo
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2008, 02:37:56 PM »

There's Italy which has several distinct traditions and styles of playing best known name is Riccardo Tesi...

A couple more Italian reccomendations - 'Il Mare di Lato' by Ciuma Delvecchio, Mario Salvi & Roberto Tombesi... Mario Salvi's solo CD 'Taranteria' is a bit of a belter too...

...Brazil with Forro Compliation CDs are available of this type of music.

'Music for Maids and Taxi Drivers' is a good grassroots Forró compilation... mixture of piano and diatonic boxes...

Africa's most famous one row player was Idi Amin (it's true) but I don't think there are any recordings by him.

Erm, yes... as immortalised by Barbet Schroeder...

Ed J
« Last Edit: March 18, 2011, 08:05:09 PM by EeeJay »
Logged

OwenG

  • Respected Sage
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 297
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2008, 04:10:27 PM »

There's an article on Cumbia here http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2008/sep/15/scene.and.heard.cumbia.

I guess the gold-plated AK-47 is an optional extra.
Logged

Matthew B

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 720
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2008, 08:50:14 PM »

A fairly low-effort exploration of box traditions other than those you list is available at http://www.cdroots.com/freereed.shtml.  there are a number of soundfiles at this site, and you can buy the CDs.  I've found some great stuff there over the years, even though their "free reed festival" is now apparently defunct.  It's all search-able as well, which makes life a bit easier. 
Logged

finnhorse

  • Guest
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2008, 10:13:26 AM »

Thank you everyone for suggestions, etc.  I've created a new folder to house all the bookmarks.  8)

I found an interesting one myself:
http://www.accordionradio.co.uk/

The "station" plays everything from Irish to Lithuanian to Tejano to classic lounge (not 100% diatonic).  The sound quality isn't the best but it's streaming 24 hours a day and the track information includes performer, composition title, and album title.  Cool!
Logged

D_mentias

  • Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 15
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2008, 10:55:22 AM »

I have recently been playing with a cheap video cam.

Here is Morrie playing a Mezon accordion in the Australain style
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=flKrlf5Kjx4

The sound is not the best but it will give you the idea. Here in Australia we were lucky that we drew our music from many traditions then this had been developed!

from that link you will be able to find 3-4 other links to Australian style session/tunes.

I hope to add to this in months to come
Logged

nousuvesi

  • Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2008, 03:09:42 AM »

Africa's most famous one row player was Idi Amin (it's true) but I don't think there are any recordings by him.

I don't think Idi Amin was famous for his accordion playing. There is a documentary out, I believe it is called simply Idi Amin, that has a video of him playing the accordion within its special features. His playing however was nothing to get excited about. If you are interested in African accordion music look into Mpete Teme from South Africa and I.K. Dairo from Nigeria. I.K. Dairo (I think) was Africa's most famous accordionist (again, I could be wrong)

Here is my short list of diatonic accordionists from around the globe worth looking into:

Basque: Iker Goenaga, Joseba Tapia
Brazil: Renato Borghetti, Gaucho da Fronteira
Russia: Leonid Yermankov (garmonika player)
Bavaria: Hans Peter Faulkner (of the band Attwenger)
Belize: Wilfred Peters (of Mr. Peters Boom and Chime)
Denmark: Carl Erik Lundgaard Jensen
Madagascar: There is a compilation entitled "Madagascar, Accordions and Ancestral Spirits", apparently they use the button accordion to commune with the dead there. It is a pretty fun CD.
Arizona: (Yes, its not a country and is apart of the US) There is a style of music here called Waila (also known as chicken scratch) played by the Native American Tribes of this region. Basically it is Native Americans interpreting Mexican interpretations of Czech and German folk music. Very similar to tex-mex. If this interests you look into: The American Indians, Desert Horizon, The Molinas and Southern Scratch.
For Central European music do a google or youtube search for styrian harmonika.

The list could go on and on. I hope this was a little helpful...

Cheers
Nathan

Oh yeah, and Israel Romero (Columbia) of the band el binomio de oro
« Last Edit: November 25, 2008, 03:29:36 AM by nousuvesi »
Logged
Nathan S.

ghijze mitter hacken

  • Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 46
  • Castagnari 8+3 in G / English concertina
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2008, 09:44:02 AM »

Logged

Theo

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 11049
  • Hohner Club Too
    • The Box Place
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2008, 12:35:13 PM »

www.lootspill.ee/

For lots of Estonian diatonic accordion.  Some of the pages have English versions
Logged
Theo Gibb - Gateshead UK

Proprietor of The Box Place for melodeon and concertina sales and service.
Follow me on Twitter and Facebook for stock updates.

Susi

  • Respected Sage
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 319
  • Nurse and music geek.
Re: anything but Irish, English, Scottish, or American
« Reply #16 on: November 29, 2008, 06:32:25 PM »

I listen to and play Swedish box music and there's a lot of interesting melodeon music in Norway. My big passion, though, is Italian melodeon music. Lots of it on You Tube if you search on organetto.
For Scandinavian music, I think I have a video of my husband playing something. It's at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfydWK0KwZg. Some Swedish polka, I think.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 


Melodeon.net - (c) Theo Gibb; Clive Williams 2010. The access and use of this website and forum featuring these terms and conditions constitutes your acceptance of these terms and conditions.