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aradru

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« on: November 07, 2012, 03:37:44 AM »

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« Last Edit: October 13, 2015, 01:23:54 AM by . »
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ladydetemps

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2012, 02:41:11 PM »

Quote
Is folk music being taught in schools, is it part of the curriculum?
 Are there any organized, structured events specifically aimed at children?
 Are there folk music classes and competitions?
 Are children playing a  variety of musical instruments?
 Are there many playing the melodeon?

*chuckles*
Well where I live I'm the youngest player and I'm in my mid 20's. I have met those that are younger at workshops/folk festivals....but they are a rare thing.

Never had anything that could be considered folk music related at school. Well...there was the one time at senior school when at lunchtime one of the teachers played some scottish music in the playground (It was for some charity dat CIN or CR I think).

I know of workshops but no competitions in my area (but then I don't get out much).
 

malcolmbebb

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2012, 02:49:51 PM »

We have a long tradition of admiring and even adopting the traditions of others, while looking down on our own.


PS referring specifically to England.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2012, 03:03:06 PM by malcolmbebb »
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Dino BPII.
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Rees

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2012, 02:54:45 PM »

Quite a lot going on in Wales. Not much in schools but we're working on it.
Various organisations running workshop weekends for all instruments. i.e. TASC, trac, Clera, etc.
Mostly fiddle, harp, flute, guitar, crwth and pibgorn but some melodeon content. No banjos.
Plenty of fierce competition at eisteddfodau.
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bobax

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2012, 03:22:20 PM »

Here in the south west there are at least 2 organisations that actively work in schools promoting folk music and traditional folk art. Folk South West based near Yeovil and Wren Music in Okehampton. With regard to playing the melodeon, Wren Music has, and is I believe, always looking for, melodeons to use with youngsters. Folk South West has just been awarded the contract for leading the singing in all schools in Somerset as part of the new Somerset Music Education Hub.
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malcolmbebb

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2012, 03:33:55 PM »

And of course the Devon Squeezebox Foundation, with Mr Rennie of this parish. This are lots of local organisations working to keep traditions going, but without much support from "the establishment".
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Dino BPII.
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Rob2Hook

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2012, 03:36:39 PM »

One of the box players in our North West side asked me to play for him to teach some morris in local junior schools.  This was, I believe, in response to requests from teachers at the schools concerned.  The kids really loved it and many were fascinated by the very concept of music played live for the purpose and none had ever seen a melodeon before.  It must have ruined the school timetable as the kids lined up for a go on the box after the lesson!  Joe has many years experience of teaching Irish dancing, so knows how to get the job done - being firm with the kids without putting them off.  It rather upset me that to visit a school nowadays, you have to go through security doors and are accompanied at all times (unlike our dancing, when I get distracted).

Rob.
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Chris Ryall

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2012, 03:43:46 PM »

I've passed it on to three children - one is now an active folk performer doing gigs. The other two have moved on to other forms of music.  Two of them are regular folk dancers - mainly euro stuff. 

One of my charities is the East Anglia Trad music trust but I wouldn't call myself 'active' at this distance! However EATMT are very good, active, and well worth a visit if you're down that way.

BTW I've also personally moved on from English country dancing - the dances are great   - but I can't stick 15 minutes of walk-through for an 10 minute dance  :-\
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howard mitchell

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2012, 04:46:57 PM »

The EFDSS is very active in education.  See http://www.efdss.org/front/Folk%20Educators%20Group/folk-educators-group/214236

In particular "The Folk Educators Group is a national networking group of folk arts educators from across England, facilitated by the English Folk Dance and Song Society. Following consultation in 2010 with folk arts educators from around the country, the Group is facilitated by EFDSS and had its first meeting in March 2011".

Also the "The Full English" project is underway.  http://www.efdss.org/front/The%20Full%20English/the-full-english/214283

This project will "... bring together the collections of Harry Albino, Lucy Broadwood, Clive Carey, Percy Grainger, Maud Karpeles, Frank Kidson, Thomas Fairman Ordish, Cecil Sharp, Ralph Vaughan Williams and Alfred Williams for the first time, to create the most comprehensive searchable database of British folk songs, tunes, dances and customs in the world.

The Full English will also be EFDSS’s biggest learning and participation programme to date, and in each of the nine regions of England will:

Work in partnership with education organisations, to increase awareness and knowledge of folk in education by training music educators and teachers, provide educational resources, regional learning events, and creative projects in primary and secondary schools and the wider community

Partner local cultural organisations to deliver community projects comprising of participatory events and concerts, archive and history projects

Carry out essential conservation work to the collections, preserving them for generations to come, and training volunteers in archive and conservation work

Provide training and volunteering opportunities to up to 223 individuals and involve around 20,000 people in activities, performances and events.."

Howard

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Sage Herb

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2012, 05:51:42 PM »

See here http://www.ryburn3step.org.uk/ for the full range of (now totally unfunded) work by this local organisation in West Yorkshire, now 21 years old. I should declare an interest in that I'm heavily involved.

cheers, Steve
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Ray

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2012, 05:53:32 PM »

Not being taught in schools, or at least not while I've been in the system, a lot of people my age aren't even aware that England has it's own style of folk music and dance, when you say folk music to people they either think of Irish stuff or Mumford and Sons.
And I don't really see that much variety in instruments, in high school the orchestra was essentially dying because people only wanted to play guitar, bass or drums (it's a very broad generalization I know, and it may only have been my school, but still worth mentioning). 
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Marje

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2012, 06:03:15 PM »

Apart from all the splendid projects named so far, there's also a steady trickle flowing down the generations. Many of the established folk players and singers of the "revival" generation now have grown-up children of their own who have been brought up going to events such as folk camps, ceilidhs and festivals, and who have moved on to take up some aspect of folk/traditional music in their own way. This has happened among both the professionals and the amateurs.

I know this is not the kind of structured education asked about in the original post, but family involvement and encouragement does make a contribution, and it's closer to traditional methods than the more formal means of instruction and promotion.
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Stiamh

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2012, 07:23:14 PM »

Not in Great Britain but, Jeunes musiciens du monde is a very inspiring project. There are now four schools in Québec teaching music to kids from disadvantaged backgrounds, using traditional music as the vehicle.

Several of my friends teach at the newest branch, in Sherbrooke, an hour down the road from me. Many of the kids are from homes facing severe problems, and many are from immigrant families that have no connection with the local traditional music. And really, the fact that it's trad music is almost incidental. The (enormous) benefits to the children come from being involved in music - any music would do. But a new generation of performers of Québec trad may well be the result. 

The project grew out of a school in India that a couple of Québecers were involved in founding: there is information on that project on the same web site.
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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #13 on: November 07, 2012, 07:42:28 PM »

I teach in a large Catholic Secondary School in SE England (not music!).

With a strong Irish tradition in school many of our girls do Irish Dance outside school - one of our students is a former champion, and has danced in America. There is a lot of dance done generally, but not traditional styles. There are often students performing to a high standard in school assemblies. The school has vocal and instrumental concerts each year and there are ukelele and steel pan bands - but not, as far as I am aware, any folk music. 

There are at least two morris clog dancers on the staff but that is not generally known to the students - who would probably think that the teachers are all mad anyway. 

Ollie

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #14 on: November 07, 2012, 07:57:47 PM »

Quote
Is folk music being taught in schools, is it part of the curriculum?
 Are there any organized, structured events specifically aimed at children?
 Are there folk music classes and competitions?
 Are children playing a  variety of musical instruments?
 Are there many playing the melodeon?

*chuckles*
Well where I live I'm the youngest player and I'm in my mid 20's. I have met those that are younger at workshops/folk festivals....but they are a rare thing.

Never had anything that could be considered folk music related at school. Well...there was the one time at senior school when at lunchtime one of the teachers played some scottish music in the playground (It was for some charity dat CIN or CR I think).

I know of workshops but no competitions in my area (but then I don't get out much).

That's just not true. You go to any major folk festival in this country (Sidmouth, Shrewsbury, Towersey etc) and you'll see that young people (under 25s) are most certainly not a rarity!

I'm 18 (nearly 19) and in my first year of University. In my time at primary school (4-11), I remember doing country dancing as part of PE in the latter years. There wasn't anything at my secondary school (11-16), but I know another local secondary school had an active folk group. This fed well into the Folk-Roots group at my sixth form college (16-18), which was really well attended, and went on a short tour in Belgium in the summer of 2012 with our college Jazz Orchestra. I believe that the local music authority Cambridgeshire Music have recently run a few successful day-long workshop Folk Days for secondary school aged kids.

Every Plough Monday, the Cambridge Morris Men, Gog Magog Molly and Mepal Molly go into primary schools in the local area to teach children about Molly dancing and the Plough Monday customs that are local to the Cambridge area. This is but once a year, though.

An exciting new project is being release very soon, that I'm very proud to have been involved in. Morris! Hey! is a new instructional DVD, book and CD package that is designed to be used in schools and other groups to teach Morris dancing (Cotswold, Border, North-West and Molly). Have a look at the website for more details, and to view the trailer video (with some rather good music  ::)) http://www.morrishey.co.uk/

The Lock In, a folk/hip hop dance extravaganza show run by the Demon Barbers, have been working with schools local to their shows and getting kids clog and rapper dancing. See here for more details - http://www.thelockindanceshow.co.uk/the-lock-in-schools-workshops/#.UJq9BmlGxEE

Hope that's of some help.  (:)
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ladydetemps

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2012, 08:14:15 PM »

Ollie you are fortunate to grow up in area like that. I don't come from somewhere with such a rich folk heritage. Ive only bumped into youngsters into folk at places like festivals.

ladydetemps

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2012, 08:16:04 PM »

I'm quite happy to be proved wrong. Btw.

Lyn

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2012, 08:49:17 PM »

Actually Ollie, my fellow Ouse Washes muso Nicky Stockman and Squire Gordon Phillips do visit the schools in Ramsay Chatteris and Whittlesey on a very regular basis and teach the children local legends and Mollie Dance. they've just returned from taking a party of  children across to Belgium to dance with children over there. Cambridge County Council is pretty supportive, I understand, unlike Norfolk County Council which has its head somewhere unmentionable and will not discuss the subject. I am wholly in favour of teaching cildren world-music/dance, but I fear we neglect our own traditions shamefully in this country while breaking our necks to accommodate other cultures. (NOT intending that last to imply any criticism of international cultural exchange!)
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Ollie

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #18 on: November 07, 2012, 08:57:00 PM »

Ollie you are fortunate to grow up in area like that. I don't come from somewhere with such a rich folk heritage. Ive only bumped into youngsters into folk at places like festivals.

There are hardly any young folkies in Cambridge, despite what I said above. My comment refered to your comment that young people are a rarity at festivals, which they certainly aren't!

Actually Ollie, my fellow Ouse Washes muso Nicky Stockman and Squire Gordon Phillips do visit the schools in Ramsay Chatteris and Whittlesey on a very regular basis and teach the children local legends and Mollie Dance. they've just returned from taking a party of  children across to Belgium to dance with children over there. Cambridge County Council is pretty supportive, I understand, unlike Norfolk County Council which has its head somewhere unmentionable and will not discuss the subject. I am wholly in favour of teaching cildren world-music/dance, but I fear we neglect our own traditions shamefully in this country while breaking our necks to accommodate other cultures. (NOT intending that last to imply any criticism of international cultural exchange!)

How could I possibly forget Ouse Washes?! The work that OW do with local school children is fantastic - the three young Molly sides at Whittlesey Straw Bear from the local schools every year are some of the best sides at the festival!
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Ray

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Re: Passing on the tradition.
« Reply #19 on: November 07, 2012, 10:02:28 PM »

I'm 18 (nearly 19) and in my first year of University. In my time at primary school (4-11), I remember doing country dancing as part of PE in the latter years.

I'd forgotten about that, my primary school did indeed do that once!
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