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Author Topic: changing fingers  (Read 1788 times)

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Peter G

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changing fingers
« on: November 24, 2008, 08:44:08 PM »

Hi all
I have read that when changing fingers (e.g moving up or down the row) 'one  should never play consecutive buttons with the same finger' This doesn't seem always to be feasible. Is it a cardinal sin (in which case i'll try harder!) or  a  case of never ... but sometimes!
Best wishes to all   :)
PeterG
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Stiamh

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Re: changing fingers
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2008, 09:04:37 PM »

You'll find there are times when this is the best option.

Shifting the same finger more than once is not such a great idea, I'd say (e.g. playing 3 consecutive buttons with your index). If you find this happening, it's probably time to pick the passage apart and look for a more elegant solution.
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george garside

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Re: changing fingers
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2008, 10:00:19 PM »

Hi all
I have read that when changing fingers (e.g moving up or down the row) 'one  should never play consecutive buttons with the same finger' This doesn't seem always to be feasible. Is it a cardinal sin (in which case i'll try harder!) or  a  case of never ... but sometimes!
Best wishes to all   :)
PeterG

there are no 'rules' to fingering only a  few of guidlines.  Asuuming that 4 fingers are resting on the four buttons that will cover a good chunk of the tune  & you need the odd next higher or lower note  then returning to the four buttons on which the fingers are resting you can either stretch the first or little finger up or down one button respectively or move the whole hand up or down by one button before returning to the original four on which they were resting.  Using either of these methods you  can be playing 2 consequitive buttons with the same finger. For longer distance travel up or down the keyboard it is often better to 'walk' up or down by eg if playing a button with third finger swap it for 1st finger while the note is still being played so ;that the other 3 fingers then rest on the next 3 buttons higher. Coming down same can be done using little finger

george
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Matt Quinn

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Re: changing fingers
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2008, 07:32:31 PM »

I was given a really good tip by Ed Rennie about melodeon fingering.
He said if you need to get 2 different notes out of 1 button (i.e. scales, consecutive notes in tunes etc), you should press the button twice.
This is good because it means that your fingers get stronger, and the notes become staccato and the tune becomes a lot clearer and crisper.

Hope that makes sense

MQ
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Peter G

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Re: changing fingers
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2008, 07:58:29 PM »

Thanks team./ It's the occasional pressing an adjacent button with the same finger when shifting the hand down (mainly) I was having trouble avoiding.It may have been in one of the tunes in George's book so George's advice is particularly apt - thanks George - pretty good after sales service! :)
Another example of Parlay syndrome: 'not so much rules as guidelines' (as the Pirates of the Caribbean would have it) - or the 'middle way'!
Many thanks I'll relax and go back to the practice.
Very best wishes
PeterG :)
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