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Author Topic: Hohner club numerals  (Read 17311 times)

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Gandy

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2013, 08:49:49 AM »

For instance I have a Club II B in the shape commonly known as "Darth Vader" and it's nothing like the older II B Victoria linked above.
I have a "Club IB" that looks almost exactly the same as the Viktoria clubs.  Bigger, and with more buttons than the Club II.
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Tony S

an bosca ceoil

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2013, 10:37:12 AM »

Quote from: Chris Ryall on Today at 04:11:32 AM
 Given the olympics link one could however see Victoria as the female form of Victor "victor ludorum"...

The German for "victor" is "victor" - so why not just use that, if that's what they meant?

 The German for the noun "victor"  is "Sieger"
 The name Victoria (on some models Viktoria) is probably no more significant than Erika/Erica.
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Theo

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2013, 10:38:59 AM »

So, who were Victoria, Erika, Carmen and later Erica and Norma?
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Etienne

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #23 on: October 01, 2013, 10:43:18 AM »

So, who were Victoria, Erika, Carmen and later Erica and Norma?

"Norma" is the goddess of normality and "Erika" is the goddess of failed tankers, don't know for "Victoria".
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Microbot

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #24 on: October 01, 2013, 11:10:54 AM »


"... "Erika" is the goddess of failed tankers....
[/quote]

That's presumably because "Erika!" is what Archimedes shouted when his bathwater overflowed onto his melodeon...?!
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Chris Ryall

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2013, 11:15:49 AM »

The Erika reference is perhaps funnier if you live in Brittany rather than Britain ;) Victoria is a popular name here, but was actually unknown until a young "Victoria", slightly unexpectedly became our queen in 1837. Basically it's a germanic import and those of us (including me) who didn't learn German at their mother's knee will be missing all sorts of nuance in this.

I suspect Theo's float of the line of female names may yet be fruitful. Most of the Castagnari models seem to map to family members.

As a political point, I can't blame Hohner for going with the flow in the '30s. Basically 99% of normal Europeans didn't want conflict, until roused by politicians. It was a matter of surviving it, though the moral issues could be stark indeed. eg I'd probably have ended up in the German Army Medical corps in that position. But that doesn't make me a facist.

I loved the concept of the glighton as a secret weapon ;D
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an bosca ceoil

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #26 on: October 01, 2013, 11:45:21 AM »

Erika was the heather (lat. erica) that bloomed on the heath in party member Herms Niel's hit number of the 1930s
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triskel

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #27 on: October 01, 2013, 02:14:51 PM »

The name Victoria (on some models Viktoria) is probably no more significant than Erika/Erica.

I'd have thought the same, until I discovered last night that the emblem of the Berlin Olympics was actually the neo-Greek Brandenburg Gate, rather than what appears to be simply a "Greek temple" on the front of the early Hohner Victoria/Viktoria models that were introduced in 1935.

The large Quadriga statue, on top of the Brandenburg Gate, was evidently important enough to Napoleon for him to steal it in 1806 and remove it to Paris, and to the Prussian General von Pfuel for him to bring it back again to Berlin, after Napoleon's defeat, in 1814 - so it was not insignificant to them, or German history - and that Victory/Victoria statue actually featured on posters for the 1936 Games:




I wouldn't be suggesting any of this as a possibility if it wasn't for those things.

But (like I said) maybe the explanation is a simpler/more innocent one, and this is all just a remarkable coincidence, and maybe those aren't swastikas on the Black Dots after all, though they were probably designed in 1933 (when Hitler came to power) before the first production batch was manufactured at the beginning of 1934...

And this is part of official Hohner company history:

Hohner had earlier made harmonicas imprinted with swastikas, though the Nazi party took issue with the practice, considering the symbol's use on Hohner's product a trivialization. The harmonica was dismissed by many Germans, due to its association with "degenerate" American jazz and blues music as well as its relatively primitive nature. 

Those short-lived harmonicas were made in 1933 and named "Die Fahne hoch!" (= "Raise the Flag!" or more usually "The Flag on High!") after the original title, and the first line, of the official Nazi Party anthem, better known as "the Horst Wessel Song", which was banned in Germany after the War.

A few of them have survived, but they are rare now: http://www.harmonicaguy.com/newfind.htm

Quote from: online translation of Hohner pamphlet
"Raise the Flag is a harmonica in keeping with today's political transformation.  It was really tough getting it into production so quickly, but we were able to do so and produce a fine product that will sell itself, and we have plenty of them, so sign up now"

Which sounds altogether rather enthusiastic, political and opportunistic on Hohner's part...  :o

Edited to add: And today (10/11/2013) I've noticed another Nazi harmonica model from 1933, quietly tucked away in the list of Hohner models. It was called "SA marschiert" ("The stormtroopers march"), which is the start of the second line from "the Horst Wessel Song"...

Here's an example, which even has a portrait of Horst Wessell (in SA/stormtrooper uniform) on the box: http://web.iwebcenters.com/grenadiermilitaryantiques/item180700.ctlg

Anyway, I don't think there can now be much doubt that the Club "Viktoria" was brought out in celebration of the 1936 Berlin Olympics (the "Nazi Olympics") and that the use of the name is probably connected with victory and/or Victory...


Edited to reinstate missing image
« Last Edit: February 21, 2018, 03:15:55 AM by triskel »
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pgroff

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #28 on: October 01, 2013, 02:46:42 PM »

Club II B Victoria : exactly the same as above but badged "Victoria" (who knows...)

I think I do, because I've just had a brainstorm and worked out the potential symbolism of it, only it's a bit like the swastikas on the older Hohner Black-Dot Double Ray boxes, which came out in April 1934 - barely a year after the Nazis came to power in Germany...  :-\

The original version of the Hohner Club II B Victoria had what appears to be a stylised/simplified (for stencilling?) Greek temple design on the front of the treble casing (along with the Hohner name) which I've long suspected must be connected with the 1936 Berlin Olympics - in fact I think I might have said as much before on melnet.

Here's the listing page for the model, from my copy of the German 1937 "Hohner Handharmonikas" catalogue;


and a photo of the emblem:


The simple and innocent explanation for this might be that it was intended to represent the Temple of Hera, at Olympia, Greece, where the torch of the Olympic flame is lit by focusing the rays of the sun. Though, in fact, that ceremony in itself (and the Olympic Torch relay) was a Nazi invention for the 1936 Games: https://leaksource.wordpress.com/2011/03/06/olympic-symbols-originated-from-hitlers-nazi-propaganda/

Whilst the very name "Victoria" (for it is she, the Roman Goddess of Victory, who rides in her 4-horse chariot, or Quadriga, on top of it) suggests that it might instead (or as well?) be intended to represent the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, which might be considered emblematic of that city (and the Olympics there) - and indeed various official 1936 Olympic pins and badges were made (they are regularly to be found on eBay; http://www.ebay.com/bhp/olympic-pin-berlin-1936) that combine the symbols of the Brandenburg Gate (complete with "Victoria" on top) and the Olympic rings, like this one:


However, though it was originally built to celebrate peace, the Brandenburg Gate became the triumphal arch of the militaristic Prussians, and on January 30th, 1933, the day Adolf Hitler was appointed to the position of Chancellor, the Nazi brown-shirts marched him in a triumphal torchlight procession around Berlin and through the Gate, which became a Party symbol:


So are we looking at a simple celebration of the 1936 Olympics taking place in Berlin, a glorification of the propaganda exercise that caused those games to be referred to as "the Nazi Olympics", Nazi Victoria/victory, or a bit of all three?

(It might all sound terribly far-fetched if it wasn't for those swastikas on Scottish melodeons...  :o)



Really interesting analysis, Stephen!

I've had one of those Viktoria clubs stencilled with the stylized greek revival columns and pediment/typanum and always found it a strange and unattractive graphic -- although the triangular typanum area does perfectly accommodate the increasing/decreasing letters of  H O H N E R   that we often see on 1930s boxes.* As I'm sure you know, there are architectural motifs in other accordion designs also.  **

Could there be letters or other documents archived at Hohner that might lend independent support to your idea? Do any of the advertisements or Club accordion tutors / music books have images or statements that play up the connection between the Viktoria and the Brandenberg gate (or the similar greek-revival structures in Munich)? ***

Thanks again for this contribution to accordion history.  I've been looking into other aspects of the iconography of accordions in the political context of the 1920s and 1930s, and your insights here are setting off more ideas!

Paul Groff

* For example:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-tMv6VjiMWcs/T2zOgzzV4uI/AAAAAAAAUjQ/nBZoY_8LIwA/s1600/three1.jpg


** Some models of Scandalli piano accordions also had a graphic reminiscent of architectural columns, e.g.
http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Vintage-Scandalli-Accordion-With-Ivory-Made-in-Italy-/00/s/Nzk3WDEyMDA=/$%28KGrHqZHJBkE63VtkvRHBO8PeBdmTQ~~60_12.JPG

*** See for example:
http://www.dianamuirappelbaum.com/?p=1251
« Last Edit: October 01, 2013, 03:09:03 PM by pgroff »
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mory

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #29 on: October 01, 2013, 04:03:46 PM »

From a previous thread on the Lillyputs and some one mentioning the DRP stamp thinking it was like the "kite mark" looking up DRP reveals something very significant in relation to these conjectures and rather sinister. AtB mory  I rather think your in the right area Stephen


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

German patents were a huge part of the Nazi war machine, as can be expected with these boxes being intended for hitler youth etc there is a strong link. a little info here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsches_Patent-_und_Markenamt AtB mory
« Last Edit: October 01, 2013, 04:05:35 PM by mory »
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triskel

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #30 on: October 05, 2013, 01:52:01 AM »

Erika was the heather (lat. erica) that bloomed on the heath in party member Herms Niel's hit number of the 1930s

In German the word for heather is Heidekraut, whilst Erika is both the name of a particular variety of heather (the genus Erica in English) and a girl's name that might best be translated as Erica (which is also an alternative German spelling of it) rather than Heather.

But, as you say, Erika was the title of a "hit" marching song by Herms Niel, written in the 1930s specially for the Waffen SS and quickly taken up by other branches of the Wehrmacht:

http://youtu.be/ir_yMv1wXj4

Erika

On the heath there grows a little flower
And it's name is Erika
A hundred thousand little bees
Swarm around Erika
Because her heart is full of sweetness,
Her flowery dress gives off a tender scent
On the heath there grows a little flower
And it's name is Erika

Back home lives a young girl
And her name is Erika
This girl is my true little darling
And my happiness, Erika
When the flower on the heath blooms lilac red,
I sing her this song in greeting.
On the heath there grows a little flower
And it's name is Erika

Another little flower blooms in my small room
And it's name is Erika
In the first rays of the morning and in the twilight
It looks at me, Erika
And it seems to me it speaks aloud:
Are you still thinking of your little bride?
Back home a young girl weeps for you
And her name is Erika

And, obviously, the words play on the two meanings of "Erika"

Now, let's draw a line under that!

________________________________________________________________________


To bring us back onto topic, Erika/Erica is one of a number of brand/model names that Hohner have recycled several times, and in this case they seem to have alternated the spellings too:

In 1905, Erika was the name of their "most popular harmonica assortment";


From 1921-24, Erica was a harmonica.

From 1935-36, Erika was a club-model accordion.

Since 1955, Erica has been the name of a 2-row, 2-voice button accordion (with rounded corners - thank goodness  :o) in any key you like, as long as it's not B/C.


Edited for redundancy, and to steer us back onto topic... ::)
« Last Edit: October 11, 2013, 05:15:13 PM by triskel »
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Christopher K.

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #31 on: October 05, 2013, 10:28:35 PM »

I'm really enjoying this thread with contributions from triskel and everyone else! It's right up my alley. Here's what Hohner has said on the Club numerals. I'm not the that this section of my document copied very well but in what should be the last column or each row is listed the switch info, if available:

CLUB I Piccoletta    CLUB    21+4    8    2         1939    
CLUB II    CLUB    21+4    8    2    0/TREMOLO    1934-39    "FOR SOLOISTS AND ORCHESTRAS"
CLUB II A    CLUB    21+4    8    2    0/TREMOLO    1935    RECESSED BASS BUTTONS
CLUB II B    CLUB    23+7    8    2    0/TREMOLO    1949-65, 73, 87, 95    "FOR BEGINNERS"
CLUB II B VICTORIA    CLUB    23+7    8    2    1/TREMOLO    1935-39, 1950s    CELLULOID
CLUB III (A) (AR)    CLUB    23+7    8    3    0/TREMOLO    1938    RECESSED BASS BUTTONS
CLUB III B    CLUB    23+7    8    3    0/TREMOLO    1938-41    
CLUB III BF    CLUB    23+7    8    3    2/TREMOLO    1938-50    1 FLUTE REGISTER
CLUB III BS    CLUB    23+7    8    3    2/OCTAVE    1949-50    
CLUB III M (de Luxe)    CLUB    23+7    8    3    5/OCTAVE, TREMOLO    1953-65, 73, 87    "FOR ADVANCED PLAYERS"
CLUB III R    CLUB    23+7    8    3    1/TREMOLO, OCTAVE    1935    SWITCHING FROM 3- TO 2-VOICE
CLUB IV    CLUB    23+7    8    3    0/TREMOLO    1935-39    
CLUB IV R    CLUB    23+7    8    3    1/OCTAVE    1935    SWITCHING FROM 3- TO 2-VOICE
CLUB VIII    CLUB    23+7    8    3    0/TREMOLO    1935    RECESSED BASS BUTTONS
CLUB IX    CLUB    23+7    8    3    1/OCTAVE    1935-37    SWITCHING FROM 3- TO 2-VOICE
CLUB X    CLUB    23+7    8    3    2/OCTAVE    1938-39    
CLUB-MORINO > SEE "MORINO CLUB"                                  
CLUB NORMA III M DE LUXE    CLUB    23+7    8    3         1980s    
CLUB-OUVERTURE    CLUB    23+7    10    4    7/OCTAVE    1953-65    
CLUB-OUVERTURE I    CLUB    23+7    10    4         1938-39    
CLUB-OUVERTURE V (S)    CLUB    23+8    8    5    11/DOUBLE OCTAVE    1973, 87, 95    

triskel

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #32 on: October 08, 2013, 02:53:24 AM »

Here's what Hohner has said on the Club numerals.

Great!  (:)

And then there are a whole lot of other Club models on “the list” that don't start with Club (just to confuse us) so I'll add them too:

ALPINA III C2, C3                Club    33        8    2, 3 0/two-voice tremolo    1995
ALPINA IV C/S3                HH/Club  46        8    3    0/two-voice tremolo    1995                 switchable between Styrian and Club
AMATI                               Club    23+2     8                          1925-27, 35, 40, 53, 57, 61, 83-87        metal hood
CLUB NORMA III M DE LUXE   Club    23+7     8    4                                   1980s
ELYSIUM I                          Club    23+7     8    3     0/tremolo                 1936-39                              bass register
ELYSIUM II                         Club    23+7     8    3                                   1939                                  bass register
ERIKA                                Club    21+4     8    2     0/tremolo                 1935-36
HOHNER’S MORINO               Club    23+2     8    3     0-2/tremolo, octave   1931
LA CONTESSA                     Club    23+2     8    3     0/tremolo, 1/octave   1929
LILIPUT                             Club    21+4      8    2     0/tremolo                 1935-40       Preciosa with enhanced specifications [sic]
L’ORGANOLA                       Club    23+2      8    3     0/tremolo, 1/octave   1929                          “original Swiss type”
MIGNON I                           Club    23+7      8    3     0/tremolo                 1936                      celluloid, small instrument
MIGNON II                          Club    23+7      8    3     1/tremolo                 1936                      celluloid, small instrument
MIGNON III                         Club    23+7      8    3     2/tremolo                 1936                      celluloid, small instrument
MODELL 214 Mascotte          Club    21+4      8    2    Tremolo                    c.1935                         student instrument
MODELL 234                       Club    23+4      8    4     2/octave, tremolo      1928-35                            Helikon bass     
MODELL 235                       Club    23+7      8    4     2/double octave        1933-42                            Helikon bass
MODELL 254                       Club    23+7      8    4     0/tremolo                 1935
MODELL 255                       Club    23+7      8    5     3/tremolo, octave      1935                                 Helikon bass
MODELL 335 MORINO           Club    23+7      8    3     2/tremolo, octave       c.1935            Tremolo On and Off switches for octave
MODELL 335 VERDI              Club    23+7      8    3     1/octave                   c.1935               "for especially demanding musicians"
MORINO CLUB (N/S)             Club    23+10   12   5     10+1/double octave     1949-65, 73, 87     “hand-made Hohner reed plates”
MORINO CLUB I                   Club    23+7     10   3     0/tremolo                   1936                                   celluloid
MORINO CLUB III                 Club    23+7      8    3     2/tremolo                  c.1935                     “for the more demanding”
MORINO CLUB IV                 Club    23+7      8    4     3/tremolo, octave       c.1935                            “highest quality”
MORINO II                          Club    23+7     10   3     1/tremolo                  1936                                    celluloid
MORINO III                         Club    23+7     10   3     2/tremolo                  1936                                    celluloid
No. 3565                            Club    21+2      8    2                                   1929                              “original Swiss model”
NORMA I                            Club    23+7      8    3      0/tremolo                 1936                                    celluloid
NORMA II                           Club    23+7      8    3     1/tremolo                  1936                                    celluloid
NORMA III                          Club    23+7      8    3     2/tremolo, 5/octave    1936, 50s, 95                    also as de Luxe
NORMA IV                          Club    23+7      8    4     7, 9/octave               1950s, 95            “For the more demanding musician!”
ORCHESTRA I                      Club    23+8      8    4     4+1                         1936-39                           baritone register
ORCHESTRA II                     Club    21         0    2      0                            1936-39                              bass register
OUVERTURE DE LUXE            Club    23+8      8    4      9/double octave        1950s
PICCOLA                            Club    19+4      8    2      0/tremolo                 1936
PRECIOSA                           Club    21+4      8    2      0/tremolo                 1935-43                   miniature instrument, celluloid
SONORA                             Club    23+7      8    3      0/tremolo                 1950s
SONORA I                           Club    23+7      8    3      0/tremolo                 1936                                      celluloid
SONORA II                          Club    23+7      8    3      1/tremolo                 1936                                      celluloid
TROVATORE                        Club    21+4      8    2      0/tremolo                 1936                                      celluloid

So you could say Hohner were quite "into" them, to quite a bewildering extent...  :o
« Last Edit: October 08, 2013, 01:33:12 PM by triskel »
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Orma

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #33 on: October 08, 2013, 01:15:50 PM »

You could add the Hohner Norma IV De luxe to the list. Mine is 23+8,  4 voice, 9 automatic switches and 2 bass switches-it's like strapping on a dog kennel to play ;D
« Last Edit: October 08, 2013, 01:20:19 PM by Orma »
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Christopher K.

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #34 on: October 11, 2013, 04:09:51 AM »

Here's what Hohner has said on the Club numerals.

Great!  (:)

And then there are a whole lot of other Club models on “the list” that don't start with Club (just to confuse us) so I'll add them too:

ALPINA III C2, C3                Club    33        8    2, 3 0/two-voice tremolo    1995
ALPINA IV C/S3                HH/Club  46        8    3    0/two-voice tremolo    1995                 switchable between Styrian and Club
AMATI                               Club    23+2     8                          1925-27, 35, 40, 53, 57, 61, 83-87        metal hood
CLUB NORMA III M DE LUXE   Club    23+7     8    4                                   1980s
ELYSIUM I                          Club    23+7     8    3     0/tremolo                 1936-39                              bass register
ELYSIUM II                         Club    23+7     8    3                                   1939                                  bass register
ERIKA                                Club    21+4     8    2     0/tremolo                 1935-36
HOHNER’S MORINO               Club    23+2     8    3     0-2/tremolo, octave   1931
LA CONTESSA                     Club    23+2     8    3     0/tremolo, 1/octave   1929
LILIPUT                             Club    21+4      8    2     0/tremolo                 1935-40       Preciosa with enhanced specifications [sic]
L’ORGANOLA                       Club    23+2      8    3     0/tremolo, 1/octave   1929                          “original Swiss type”
MIGNON I                           Club    23+7      8    3     0/tremolo                 1936                      celluloid, small instrument
MIGNON II                          Club    23+7      8    3     1/tremolo                 1936                      celluloid, small instrument
MIGNON III                         Club    23+7      8    3     2/tremolo                 1936                      celluloid, small instrument
MODELL 214 Mascotte          Club    21+4      8    2    Tremolo                    c.1935                         student instrument
MODELL 234                       Club    23+4      8    4     2/octave, tremolo      1928-35                            Helikon bass     
MODELL 235                       Club    23+7      8    4     2/double octave        1933-42                            Helikon bass
MODELL 254                       Club    23+7      8    4     0/tremolo                 1935
MODELL 255                       Club    23+7      8    5     3/tremolo, octave      1935                                 Helikon bass
MODELL 335 MORINO           Club    23+7      8    3     2/tremolo, octave       c.1935            Tremolo On and Off switches for octave
MODELL 335 VERDI              Club    23+7      8    3     1/octave                   c.1935               "for especially demanding musicians"
MORINO CLUB (N/S)             Club    23+10   12   5     10+1/double octave     1949-65, 73, 87     “hand-made Hohner reed plates”
MORINO CLUB I                   Club    23+7     10   3     0/tremolo                   1936                                   celluloid
MORINO CLUB III                 Club    23+7      8    3     2/tremolo                  c.1935                     “for the more demanding”
MORINO CLUB IV                 Club    23+7      8    4     3/tremolo, octave       c.1935                            “highest quality”
MORINO II                          Club    23+7     10   3     1/tremolo                  1936                                    celluloid
MORINO III                         Club    23+7     10   3     2/tremolo                  1936                                    celluloid
No. 3565                            Club    21+2      8    2                                   1929                              “original Swiss model”
NORMA I                            Club    23+7      8    3      0/tremolo                 1936                                    celluloid
NORMA II                           Club    23+7      8    3     1/tremolo                  1936                                    celluloid
NORMA III                          Club    23+7      8    3     2/tremolo, 5/octave    1936, 50s, 95                    also as de Luxe
NORMA IV                          Club    23+7      8    4     7, 9/octave               1950s, 95            “For the more demanding musician!”
ORCHESTRA I                      Club    23+8      8    4     4+1                         1936-39                           baritone register
ORCHESTRA II                     Club    21         0    2      0                            1936-39                              bass register
OUVERTURE DE LUXE            Club    23+8      8    4      9/double octave        1950s
PICCOLA                            Club    19+4      8    2      0/tremolo                 1936
PRECIOSA                           Club    21+4      8    2      0/tremolo                 1935-43                   miniature instrument, celluloid
SONORA                             Club    23+7      8    3      0/tremolo                 1950s
SONORA I                           Club    23+7      8    3      0/tremolo                 1936                                      celluloid
SONORA II                          Club    23+7      8    3      1/tremolo                 1936                                      celluloid
TROVATORE                        Club    21+4      8    2      0/tremolo                 1936                                      celluloid

So you could say Hohner were quite "into" them, to quite a bewildering extent...  :o

Bewildering indeed. :-) Thanks, Stephen, later tonight I'm going to cross check my list at home with the above to make sure I haven't missed any. What I did a while back was to type the appendix from History Unfolds into an Excel spreadsheet, and then notate it it with additional references to model names such as the above, also adding another column with notes for if I own the box or have a photo of it. If anything, I think the plethora of Club models could show how popular the system was, or how popular Hohner wanted it to be.

Etienne

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #35 on: October 11, 2013, 08:53:07 AM »

If anything, I think the plethora of Club models could show how popular the system was, or how popular Hohner wanted it to be.
I don't think that Clubs popularity was a "Hohner thing", there is a lot of Club boxes from German, Swiss and Italian makers (Meinel and Herold, Tell, Paolo Soprani, Ranco Luigi...)
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matt vrs

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #36 on: October 11, 2013, 08:59:47 AM »

I'm sure this must have come up before but I can't find the answer: do you know why they are called Clubs?  Is it because the music you could make with them was more "sophisticated", the kind of thing you might play in a fancy club instead of some pub with sawdust on the floor?  Did people used to get together in clubs to play them?
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triskel

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #37 on: October 11, 2013, 11:39:22 AM »

If anything, I think the plethora of Club models could show how popular the system was, or how popular Hohner wanted it to be.
I don't think that Clubs popularity was a "Hohner thing", there is a lot of Club boxes from German, Swiss and Italian makers (Meinel and Herold, Tell, Paolo Soprani, Ranco Luigi...)
I'm sure this must have come up before but I can't find the answer: do you know why they are called Clubs? ... Did people used to get together in clubs to play them?

They were originally referred to as Swiss models, but in the 1930s Hohner strongly promoted the "Club Model" as a sort-of "poor man's piano accordion" for amateur accordion club bands.


For example, my copy of the Irish c.1934 Hohner catalogue has the slogan "Form or Join a Hohner Accordion Club";


and goes on to say that:

Quote from: Irish Hohner catalogue, c.1934
The Accordion Club Movement is world wide. There are thousands of clubs abroad. The movement is tremendously popular.

Pioneered by the Hohner organisation, and aided by the Helbling simple system of self-tuition for the "Club" Model Accordions, the movement is rapidly gaining in public favour.

You should form or join an Accordion Club. Ask your music dealer for particulars or write to : The Hohner Accordion Centre, 27, Upper Liffey Street, Dublin, for full information. Furnish, at the same time, the name and address of your regular dealer. We can then enlist his co-operation in organising a club.

In one of the photos in that catalogue, of the Tower Hohner Accordion Band (of Drogheda), you can see Club Models mixed in with piano accordions (as they were also in the Hohner factory Orchestra, amongst others), but the McHugh Hohner Club Model Accordion Band and the Marksman Hohner Club Model Accordion Band (both of Dublin) used only Cub models, whilst the Dublin Hohner Piano-Accordion Band speaks for itself ::).

They were also busy (since the mid-1920s) promoting harmonica bands, and building special models (like the "Song-Band Harmonicas" in Tremolo, Octave or Alto Tuning, at 3 shillings [15p.] each in that same catalogue) - for those with even less to spend.

It was a strategy that helped Hohner to do well in tough times, though it does sound a bit "world-conquering"  :o


Edited to add extended quote from c.1934 Irish Hohner catalogue and photos
« Last Edit: October 13, 2013, 01:05:42 PM by triskel »
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matt vrs

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #38 on: October 11, 2013, 12:02:40 PM »

Thank you triskel, that's good to know.  I've played in accordion bands myself (still do) and I'm happy to know that these lovely club instruments were part of the same tradition.
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ethelden

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #39 on: October 15, 2013, 07:52:28 PM »

I have acquired a Club BF 111. havnt a clue what its keys are & can see no markings on the instrument. can anyone give me any clues on what to look for?
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