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Author Topic: Hohner club numerals  (Read 18257 times)

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an bosca ceoil

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #40 on: October 15, 2013, 09:17:58 PM »

Not usually marked anywhere.(Outside)
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tirpous

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #41 on: October 16, 2013, 12:23:54 AM »

Quote
I have acquired a Club BF 111. havnt a clue what its keys are & can see no markings on the instrument. can anyone give me any clues on what to look for?

Check the pitch of the gleichton (special button near the center of the middle row, playing same note on push and pull).

If it is Bb you have a Bb/Eb
C means you have a C/F
D would be D/G

See typical keyboard layouts at http://forum.melodeon.net/index.php/page,keyboard_25_row.html
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Theo

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #42 on: October 16, 2013, 08:03:40 AM »

If it is one of the models where the ends of the fingerboard are black painted wood the key will be stamped on the lower edge of the keyboard.  Most common is CF, they were also made in Bb/Eb.  DG only if it has been converted later.
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Theo Gibb - Gateshead UK

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ethelden

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #43 on: October 16, 2013, 12:11:36 PM »

Many thanks for your help. Looks like I have a C/F!
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triskel

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #44 on: October 16, 2013, 12:17:11 PM »

Many thanks for your help. Looks like I have a C/F!

I'm not a betting man, but I'd (almost) have put money on it - that's the usual key for a Club.
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pgroff

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #45 on: October 09, 2014, 08:32:13 PM »

Following up the thread drift in this topic above, the subtopic of accordions with architectural columns as part of their decoration, here's another kind of Scandalli PA with the columns:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-SCANDALLI-CAMERANO-ITALIAN-ACCORDION-37-Keys-80-Bass-Model-55-54-/390947814244

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Etienne

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #46 on: May 25, 2016, 09:01:58 AM »

A new find
Hohner Super Suisse III, Right hand : 23+7 / MML / 2 switchs under the keyboard (M/MM/ML/MML) - Left hand : 8 Basses - No straps for bellow closing but a lever under the RH keyboard - Design looks a little bit like a black morino
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Old hohner and old Dedenis
http://pousser-tirer.blogspot.com

triskel

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #47 on: February 25, 2017, 06:24:21 AM »

I've been looking into other aspects of the iconography of accordions in the political context of the 1920s and 1930s, and your insights here are setting off more ideas!

** Some models of Scandalli piano accordions ... had a graphic reminiscent of architectural columns, e.g.
http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Vintage-Scandalli-Accordion-With-Ivory-Made-in-Italy-/00/s/Nzk3WDEyMDA=/$%28KGrHqZHJBkE63VtkvRHBO8PeBdmTQ~~60_12.JPG

I've had another eureka moment Paul, after finding a very clear image of that Scandalli graphic, and it turns out to be a Scandalli badge of sorts, since it incorporates the firm's name and location. So that has prompted me to look for a monument resembling it in the vicinity.


Now Camerano is a municipality in the Province of Ancona, and it turns out that the structure is evidently a stylised rendering of the Passetto Monument at Ancona, a War Memorial to the Fallen of the First World War that was inaugurated in 1930, and is considered a classic example of Fascist architecture. (Those are fasces sticking up, making the "crown" of it!)

Not surprisingly it is located right at the end of Viale della Vittoria (that word Victory/Victoria again!), a tree-lined avenue that connects the area with the historic centre of the city.

So Scandalli were celebrating a neo-Classical Fascist monument, and probably setting a precedent for Hohner...
« Last Edit: February 26, 2017, 11:48:26 PM by triskel »
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pgroff

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #48 on: February 25, 2017, 11:24:12 AM »

Thanks Stephen!

Really this idea would be an excellent article (if not Ph.D. thesis), if handled appropriately.

PG
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smiley

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #49 on: February 26, 2017, 06:42:25 AM »

Quick, bury all mention of the fascist connections before our militant melodeonista comrades discover the dark stain we bear >:E
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Ebor_fiddler

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #50 on: February 26, 2017, 07:50:40 PM »

And hide our Liliputs!
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I'm a Yorkie!
My other melodeon's a fiddle, but one of my Hohners has six strings! I also play a very red Hawkins Bazaar in C and a generic Klingenthaler spoon bass in F.!! My other pets (played) are gobirons - Hohner Marine Band in C, Hohner Tremolo in D and a Chinese Thingy Tremolo in G.

Garry Probert

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #51 on: February 28, 2017, 01:07:16 PM »

Hi guys
Quote
Quick, bury all mention of the fascist connections before our militant melodeonista comrades discover the dark stain we bear
Quote
And hide our Liliputs!
Having a young military historian in the family I'm really having to rethink my position on just about all my preconceptions on ww2
After a heated but friendly debate on the "humanity of the victors" she sent me a link to a bbc documentary

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8kh_X-7ojY

I must warn you its Its rather harrowing stuff and has severely dented my perception of " the dark stain we all bear"
 
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triskel

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Re: Hohner club numerals
« Reply #52 on: February 21, 2018, 04:08:15 AM »

The German for the noun "victor"  is "Sieger"
 The name Victoria (on some models Viktoria) is probably no more significant than Erika/Erica.

It seems not only did the SS have a march called Erika, they also had one named Sieg Heil Viktoria, and do you notice what has been chosen as the opening image of the YouTube clip (with English subtitles)) I've linked to of it? That's the very Quadriga statue of the Roman Victory/Victoria/Viktoria* goddess atop the Brandenburg Gate that I've been talking about the significance of (to the Prussians, Napoleon, and later the Nazis).

But I'd be more interested in how ordinary people get through wars, and the effects they have on society, culture, music, musical instruments, fashions, technological progress, manufacturing, etc. (because wars can be huge watersheds in such things), rather than in the battles and politics, victories and defeats of them. Hence I was reading the Readers Digest book "Life on the Home Front" and stumbled on a section about how:

Quote from: Readers Digest "Life on the Home Front" (p.107)
The V sign, symbolising Victory, was devised as an emblem of the Resistance by two Belgians working for the BBC Belgian Service. From January 1941 the BBC started urging listeners in Belgium to go out under cover of darkness and chalk the V sign on doors, walls and pavements. The campaign soon spread to other European countries.

 ...

Haunted by the V campaign, the Germans eventually responded by attempting to appropriate the symbol for themselves. It was made to stand for Viktoria - an antiquated Teutonic word - and they began to print posters of their own bearing a huge white V.







Indeed a huge white V even got placed on the Eiffel Tower in Paris with a banner saying "Germany triumphs on all fronts":


So it seems Viktoria could, and indeed did, have the meaning/usage/symbolism of Victory at that time, at least with the Nazis, though it may now be rather archaic/arcane...

_________________________________________________________________

* Victory, Victoria and Viktoria can be seen as synonyms. In the original Latin Victoria is both the word for Victory and the name of its personification in the goddess, whilst Viktoria is a later German spelling dating from the revision of German spelling, by nationalists, in the last quarter of the 19th century - when, for example, "Concertina" became "Konzertina" and "Accordion" (the original Demian spelling) became "Akkordeon".
« Last Edit: February 24, 2018, 04:16:05 PM by triskel »
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