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Author Topic: Sliding from row to row B/C  (Read 1631 times)

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hopey

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Sliding from row to row B/C
« on: January 10, 2009, 01:51:39 PM »

Hi,
   I've just watched a DVD,  an introduction to Irish styles. In the DVD it was suggested that when playing a scale in D, that you slide down then up over the notes-E,F#,G, with 1 finger 
 I can understand that sliding from the inner row outwards would be comfortable/convenient ,but, do many players slide from the outer row inwards?
  As well as learning scales I'm trying to work out a few tunes and I wonder if anyone can suggest some nice waltzes for a beginner?
                                                   
                                                                                                                 Thank you
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Stiamh

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Re: Sliding from row to row B/C
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2009, 03:41:18 PM »

... it was suggested that when playing a scale in D, that you slide down then up over the notes-E,F#,G, with 1 finger.

That seems a little extreme. Damien Connolly is a great proponent of sliding too but he says he never slides twice with the same finger.

Another way you could play those notes E-F#-G would be to use fingers 2-3-2, crossing over as it were (assuming that you were starting on the 2nd finger, which you would be in a scale of D). I find this to be an exceedingly useful device - 1-2-1 works very well too. You would end up with the 2nd finger on G, exactly as if you slid as recommended in your DVD.

Quote
I can understand that sliding from the inner row outwards would be comfortable/convenient ,but, do many players slide from the outer row inwards?

I don't know how prevalent it is but many things that seem awkward or counterintuitive when you start will look perfectly doable in a few months' or years' time.

Waltzes are a very good thing to practice at first I think. Just about anything will do as long as it's not some fancy musette tune - play tunes that you like! I had fun when learning (and still today) with things like Jerry Holland's "My Cape Breton Home", Josephine's (Josefin?) Waltz, and a few Swedish waltzes such as "Boda Valsen" (I think there might be a raft of tunes with that name though). But anything that appeals to you would do.
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risto

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Re: Sliding from row to row B/C
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2009, 10:19:43 PM »

Hi,
I've just watched a DVD,  an introduction to Irish styles. In the DVD it was suggested that when playing a scale in D, that you slide down then up over the notes-E,F#,G, with 1 finger  ... 

Sounds weird, are you sure it is not something that only emphasises the use of slide ie. a practise for it and not meaning to be the final and optimal way? This is exactly why you need a second opinion, ie. watch all DVDs you can afford.

Waltzes:

If you like this Canadian Waltz, the Ookpik Waltz, see set #14, first tune in the set: http://www.tipsyhouse.com/listen.html

then here is my transcription of it:
http://www.kolumbus.fi/slowsession/Haitarihuone/The_Ookpik_Waltz-Risto.pdf

PS. The Ookpik Waltz was the first tune I learned with B/C. The latter Waltz is btw. very much like Finnish walzes.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2009, 10:28:34 PM by risto »
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