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Author Topic: legato  (Read 3667 times)

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Chris Ryall

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Re: legato
« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2013, 10:29:35 AM »

While we are tidying off, agree with George that legato/stacato can be done both ways with practice, though in my view that rows/crossing "favours" a style. But in the end you'll be doing these for other reasons.

Disagree about overlapping the notes, we've all tried that but I think it has a minimal place in music (and is impossible when a push/pull change happens)! This is to deliberately blur and defocus your music and can easily end up as "slush"? Stacato might have real gaps between note, lagato "touching", but actually "attitude" is more important. Let your instrument express your feelings.

Musically … a lot of this is in "attack", the first millisecond of a note, anacrusis. But don't forget to have clean note ends too. Stopping a note is as much a rhythmic "event" as starting one? That too can be abrupt, or otherwise.

Try out the TOTM "Orange and Blue" videos, which were played in both styles
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Theo

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Re: legato
« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2013, 11:18:42 AM »

One very important point about learning to play staccato that has not be mentioned:   when you have a run of notes all in the same bellows direction (eg the start of Winster Gallop all on G B D) then you have to learn to play staccato because the push/pull nature of the box is not helping you.   It is vital to be sufficiently in control of the staccato/legato thing that it's your choice which comes out, rather than it just being dictated by the nature of the instrument
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Theo Gibb - Gateshead UK

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Chris Ryall

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Re: legato
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2013, 11:41:00 AM »

The mazurka féline is a nice exploration of this demarcation, especially towards the end!  Also great to dance to 8)
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fc diato

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Re: legato
« Reply #23 on: September 14, 2013, 02:45:29 PM »

For beginners, there is a good primer on this (with excercices, simple examples etc.) here:

http://www.erwan-diato.fr/espace-cours/detache-des-notes.php

It's in French though, but the key words are recognizable.
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Peter G

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Re: legato
« Reply #24 on: September 19, 2013, 07:20:49 PM »

I guess it's a sign of growing confidence that I feel able to offer an opinion, but I rather agree with Chris about the 'slush' thing - I found it did tend to happen anyway in the early stages of learning, just from poor finger control, but I don't really like it; obviously heavily influenced by the fact that my main interest is in getting up to speed for Morris.   
Oysterboy: 'I bet you're glad you asked' - not arf (said the seal) - I love a good discussion (but I didn't come here for a good argument  ;D)
Back to practising then -perfection in the moment?
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