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Author Topic: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes  (Read 6238 times)

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Pete Dunk

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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #20 on: November 09, 2013, 11:11:43 PM »

It is a lumpy old tune that seems to be made up of bits from other tunes

It most certainly is but the name of the most obvious tune escapes me. Arrrrgggghhhh!
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Mary Humphreys

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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2013, 11:21:09 PM »

Flowers of Edinburgh springs to mind.
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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2013, 11:53:01 PM »

And another one from the same area, played by me this time:

https://soundcloud.com/anahatamelodeon/bob-ridley-o-1

One of 4 Molly tunes I've just recorded and put on CD for a school Molly team in Whittlesea, as their old practice tape has worn out after 17 years! Hence the 4 bar intro...

Edit to add: this one has bits of two other tunes in it: Shave the Donkey (or The Triumph) and Winster Gallop.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2013, 12:03:15 AM by Anahata »
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Ellisteph

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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #23 on: November 24, 2013, 05:35:22 PM »

This thread's gone a bit quiet; here's my attempt to revive it. My home town is blessed with two tunes called Nantwich Fair (albeit with different spellings). Both are in John Offord's excellent book 'John of the Green - the Cheshire Way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWCdQmsxh9Q&feature=c4-overview&list=UUdZHt0iER2BZXOlJxWwulBA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiJ4nk5KdwQ&feature=c4-overview&list=UUdZHt0iER2BZXOlJxWwulBA



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bellmartin

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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #24 on: November 26, 2013, 01:47:07 AM »

Here's my two-cents worth: The Old Red Barn Quadrille, a Missouri fiddle tune. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ_YjMbFOhw

The C and D music was written by Mid-Missouri fiddler Charlie Walden.

Played on a Dino Baffetti Binci 3-voice DG melodeon.

I did not know, before this Theme of the Month was posted, that my home state, Missouri, has a rich fiddle tradition. A lot of factors have influenced why Missouri has been so prolific in fiddle music and square dancing, whereas Kansas next door, for instance, has not. Scots and Ulster Scots who were not ashamed to raise a cup landed on good farmland in Missouri and produced generations of tunes and a strong dance (and party) tradition. People who moved on west, like many tee-total Germans, had tougher lives in a harsher climate, and this art did not flourish with them.

One influence on the development of Missouri fiddle tunes in relatively more recent generations was a Canadian radio station, the signal of which drifted all these hundreds and hundreds of miles and brought the sound of Scottish fiddle music, which players here added to their repertoire.

The fact that The Old Red Barn Quadrille is in 6/8 time makes it rather rare. Apparently Missouri fiddlers didn't much like "six-eighters" and neither did their guitarists, who found it quite awkward to do accompaniment patterns in 6/8.

It's been exciting to discover these things - thanks to Melnet for that. One of our top fiddlers, Michael Fraser, lives within a stone's throw of my house. Who knew? Gotta get to know him.

Lots to learn, and how fun!
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 02:31:08 AM by bellmartin »
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RogerT

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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #25 on: November 26, 2013, 07:14:42 AM »

Here's my two-cents worth: The Old Red Barn Quadrille, a Missouri fiddle tune. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ_YjMbFOhw

The C and D music was written by Mid-Missouri fiddler Charlie Walden.

Played on a Dino Baffetti Binci 3-voice DG melodeon.

I did not know, before this Theme of the Month was posted, that my home state, Missouri, has a rich fiddle tradition. A lot of factors have influenced why Missouri has been so prolific in fiddle music and square dancing, whereas Kansas next door, for instance, has not. Scots and Ulster Scots who were not ashamed to raise a cup landed on good farmland in Missouri and produced generations of tunes and a strong dance (and party) tradition. People who moved on west, like many tee-total Germans, had tougher lives in a harsher climate, and this art did not flourish with them.

One influence on the development of Missouri fiddle tunes in relatively more recent generations was a Canadian radio station, the signal of which drifted all these hundreds and hundreds of miles and brought the sound of Scottish fiddle music, which players here added to their repertoire.

The fact that The Old Red Barn Quadrille is in 6/8 time makes it rather rare. Apparently Missouri fiddlers didn't much like "six-eighters" and neither did their guitarists, who found it quite awkward to do accompaniment patterns in 6/8.

It's been exciting to discover these things - thanks to Melnet for that. One of our top fiddlers, Michael Fraser, lives within a stone's throw of my house. Who knew? Gotta get to know him.

Lots to learn, and how fun!

Hey Bellmartin, thanks. V interesting. I recently read the Dee Brown book about the American West (not Bury My Heart..the other one); where in Missouri, so I can take a look on Google Earth? And guitarists at my local Folk Club still have issues with 6/8 and even more so with 9/8..

Mystery Jig

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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #26 on: November 26, 2013, 01:24:37 PM »

Here's my two-cents worth: The Old Red Barn Quadrille, a Missouri fiddle tune. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ_YjMbFOhw

The C and D music was written by Mid-Missouri fiddler Charlie Walden.

Played on a Dino Baffetti Binci 3-voice DG melodeon.

I did not know, before this Theme of the Month was posted, that my home state, Missouri, has a rich fiddle tradition. A lot of factors have influenced why Missouri has been so prolific in fiddle music and square dancing, whereas Kansas next door, for instance, has not. Scots and Ulster Scots who were not ashamed to raise a cup landed on good farmland in Missouri and produced generations of tunes and a strong dance (and party) tradition. People who moved on west, like many tee-total Germans, had tougher lives in a harsher climate, and this art did not flourish with them.

One influence on the development of Missouri fiddle tunes in relatively more recent generations was a Canadian radio station, the signal of which drifted all these hundreds and hundreds of miles and brought the sound of Scottish fiddle music, which players here added to their repertoire.

The fact that The Old Red Barn Quadrille is in 6/8 time makes it rather rare. Apparently Missouri fiddlers didn't much like "six-eighters" and neither did their guitarists, who found it quite awkward to do accompaniment patterns in 6/8.

It's been exciting to discover these things - thanks to Melnet for that. One of our top fiddlers, Michael Fraser, lives within a stone's throw of my house. Who knew? Gotta get to know him.

Lots to learn, and how fun!

Great tune, great playing, great box and a great story! Thanks for posting!
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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #27 on: November 30, 2013, 08:04:42 PM »

Phew! Just in time!! :Ph
Two tunes which are local in different ways.
The first, She Wants a Fellow, is a traditional tune, a version of which is in the Browne Collection which was housed at Town End, Troutbeck, about a mile from where I live. It seems to originate with the Wilson family who lived at Troutbeck Bridge which is even nearer to here. There is a note in the manuscript referring to Kesswick, 1833 although it's not clear whether this is a reference to the town of Keswick a bit further North in Cumbria.
The second tune was written and paired with the first by my good friend and box player for our band Tumbling Tom, Hugh Taylor (of this parish). Hugh lives in Cumbria too but a bit nearer to the border with our shared county of origin, Lancashire. Hugh doesn't really think that his tune qualifies as a local tune but whether it does or not, I think it deserved an outing. The title refers to the groups of triplets and seems a good match for the first tune.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xLCHrcI7Yw



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Ellisteph

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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #28 on: November 30, 2013, 11:02:56 PM »

Phew! Just in time!! :Ph
Two tunes which are local in different ways.
The first, She Wants a Fellow, is a traditional tune, a version of which is in the Browne Collection which was housed at Town End, Troutbeck, about a mile from where I live. It seems to originate with the Wilson family who lived at Troutbeck Bridge which is even nearer to here. There is a note in the manuscript referring to Kesswick, 1833 although it's not clear whether this is a reference to the town of Keswick a bit further North in Cumbria.
The second tune was written and paired with the first by my good friend and box player for our band Tumbling Tom, Hugh Taylor (of this parish). Hugh lives in Cumbria too but a bit nearer to the border with our shared county of origin, Lancashire. Hugh doesn't really think that his tune qualifies as a local tune but whether it does or not, I think it deserved an outing. The title refers to the groups of triplets and seems a good match for the first tune.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xLCHrcI7Yw

Excellent set well played as always
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Clive Williams

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Re: Theme of the Month for November 2013: Local Tunes
« Reply #29 on: December 01, 2013, 12:44:19 AM »

Well done folks - on to the next theme! Stick late posts on the end here as ever!
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