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Author Topic: Self taught??  (Read 6565 times)

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Chris Ryall

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Re: Self taught??
« Reply #60 on: January 30, 2014, 11:19:03 PM »

I actually think Marge got it … so close to how it is as makes no difference. Yes there are other ways, but as a broad brush summary … pretty accurate?
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Anahata

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Re: Self taught??
« Reply #61 on: January 30, 2014, 11:37:24 PM »

As a beginner on a B/C I'm interested in the views on the importance of scale practice. With many instruments eg flute or whistle there is only one choice of fingering for a particular note.  On a B/C it is apparent that there are a number of choices of fingers to use for a particular note and the choice seems to be dependent on the notes coming before or after in the tune.  So how do you practice scales?

The fact that you can play tunes and scales in all keys on a B/C is all the more reason for practising  them.
And when there are different fingerings, either pick one that works best or, better, find every one that you might ever need in a real tune and learn them all. The whole point of that kind of practice is to leave no stone unturned, to eliminate every single dead area where your fingers are being asked to make a sequence of movements they have never done before, so whatever you are playing, in what ever key, they've been there and done that.

You need to work on simple patterns that repeat up and down the scale too. In the classical world, whole books of such things are published...

The result of this kind of practice is that you can play anything.

Actually I've not deliberately practiced scales, arpeggios and other pattern based exercises on the melodeon, but I used to on the cello, so I know what it's like. I might try it...
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Chris Ryall

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Re: Self taught??
« Reply #62 on: January 31, 2014, 12:11:19 AM »

you need a 3-row. But then it wouldn't be a melodeon?
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Stiamh

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Re: Self taught??
« Reply #63 on: January 31, 2014, 03:18:49 AM »

As a beginner on a B/C I'm interested in the views on the importance of scale practice. With many instruments eg flute or whistle there is only one choice of fingering for a particular note.  On a B/C it is apparent that there are a number of choices of fingers to use for a particular note and the choice seems to be dependent on the notes coming before or after in the tune.  So how do you practice scales?

Try this old thread, which links to a couple of others as well: http://forum.melodeon.net/index.php?topic=1215.0
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Gromit

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Re: Self taught??
« Reply #64 on: January 31, 2014, 08:29:40 AM »

Quote
With many instruments eg flute or whistle there is only one choice of fingering for a particular note

On a concert flute (wooden flute used in ITM) there are alternative fingerings for various notes - cross fingering and half holing on flute and whistle, and 2 Fnat keys on the keyed flute.
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Earbrass

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Re: Self taught??
« Reply #65 on: January 31, 2014, 11:03:44 AM »

On a B/C it is apparent that there are a number of choices of fingers to use for a particular note and the choice seems to be dependent on the notes coming before or after in the tune.  So how do you practice scales?

My suggestion for the particular issue you raise would be to try playing the notes in your scales in different orders - once you've played 12345678, 87654321, try different patterns like 132435465768,867564534231 or 1425364758617283 and so on. OK, you won't cover them all, but the more variety, the more you'll find fingering patterns that you can reuse in real tune playing.
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GPS

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Re: Self taught??
« Reply #66 on: January 31, 2014, 03:28:02 PM »

If you have a two-row box, I can't see the point in playing it like a one-row and not taking advantage of row-crossing,

By the same token, I can't see the point in row-crossing when it isn't necessary just because you can. I tend to play "on the row" much of the time, but use cross-rowing when it's necessary to get a note you can't get any other way, when it makes a particular phrase easier to play, or when a tune needs a more legato feel. Cross-rowing is a useful tool, but not the only way to approach a 2-row.

Cheers
Graham
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Among others, Saltarelle Pastourelle II D/G; Hohner 4-stop 1-rows in C & G; assorted Hohners; 3-voice German (?) G/C of uncertain parentage; lovely little Hlavacek 1-row Heligonka; B♭/E♭ Koch. Newly acquired G/C Hohner Viktoria. Also Fender Jazz bass, Telecaster, Stratocaster, Epiphone Sheraton, Charvel-Jackson 00-style acoustic guitar and other stuff..........

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deltasalmon

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Re: Self taught??
« Reply #67 on: January 31, 2014, 03:36:52 PM »

My suggestion for the particular issue you raise would be to try playing the notes in your scales in different orders - once you've played 12345678, 87654321, try different patterns like 132435465768,867564534231 or 1425364758617283 and so on. OK, you won't cover them all, but the more variety, the more you'll find fingering patterns that you can reuse in real tune playing.

When I was young and learning different scales on guitar that was how I practiced. It helped a lot with improvisation for playing blues and jazz and in general my fingers just felt a lot more comfortable on the fretboard.
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Sean McGinnis
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pikey

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Re: Self taught??
« Reply #68 on: January 31, 2014, 07:06:51 PM »

My advice is to do an octave plus one eg GABCDEF#Ga then come back down the scale again.

Thats how singing teaching often works. On a melodeon it helps you learn the transition into the next octave.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2014, 07:08:41 PM by pikey »
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