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Author Topic: Music software  (Read 3517 times)

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Chris Ryall

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Re: Music software
« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2014, 10:12:21 AM »

An interesting point occurred to me on reading your post, Chris, and that is that isn't this very similar to what you would do with ABC? - and in fact MuseScore will convert ABC.

I don't think the internal representation matters a jot, be that a browsable ABC or machine washable 1EF28DB7. Interestingly all representations seem to be "relative" in some way. The staves are relative to some "clef" note (as Edinburgh melnetters discovered)! And in ABC "G" may be specified as dorian, mixolydian, whatever. Which is equivalent to further specifying "in G but using F, or D notes …" It all comes to the same thing?

Back to topic, I'm clearly not the man to help with your scan/recognise problem. Though I do recall a 60's typewriter (remember those?) patent where you could transpose using a multi position shift key!
« Last Edit: August 19, 2014, 10:14:41 AM by Chris Ryall »
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Howard Jones

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Re: Music software
« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2014, 12:51:50 PM »


It does sort of work, but it makes so many mistakes that it is actually easier to type the music in from scratch.

That's been my experience of the demo versions of scanning software I've tried out.  If you're working with a complex classical score then it may be worth the effort to scan and edit, but for the sort of music I suspect most of us are interested in (short, simple single melodies) then it's quicker to enter it into your music editor of choice.

Idelone

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Re: Music software
« Reply #22 on: August 20, 2014, 10:26:06 AM »

Chris (Brimley), Regarding TablEdit versus MuseScore, I started with TE and found MS a lot later (via a forum posting on this site), and although there were certain features that I liked with MS, I found that TE was geared towards the melodeon, and keyboard entry was slightly quicker (F-keys to change note values, tab and enter keys doing what they say, etc.). I ran the two systems in parallel for a while but then decided to stay with TE; it bore similarities to the previously mentioned Notator/Creator. All systems have their quirks, but you eventually settle on one that suits you the most.

Chris (Ryall),
I don't think the internal representation matters a jot, be that a browsable ABC or machine washable 1EF28DB7. Interestingly all representations seem to be "relative" in some way. The staves are relative to some "clef" note (as Edinburgh melnetters discovered)! And in ABC "G" may be specified as dorian, mixolydian, whatever. Which is equivalent to further specifying "in G but using F, or D notes …" It all comes to the same thing?

Sorry Chris, but you've lost me on this one.


Back on topic: I haven't required scanning software, but if I need a copy of a piece of music I would either import an ABC file or enter it by hand, either is a relatively quick process, but it still takes time to do. So, from what other are saying, although it appears that accuracy is a little suspect from these packages, what you gain on scan time you spend on checking and correcting; just a different use of time.

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Chris Brimley

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Re: Music software
« Reply #23 on: August 20, 2014, 01:25:04 PM »

Idelone, I think we're in almost complete agreement - re MS vs TE, the note length in MS can be specified by the numbers rather than F keys - pretty much the same, I guess.  I use the mouse because it's then all easily right handed, and the notes are all LH.

To be fair to the scanning software on accuracy, I think the best packages explain that the problem is where the original is not very clear - one system gives an example where the type of beams used couldn't be picked up because they actually overlapped on the score.  The eye/brain uses a whole lot of background experience in interpreting shapes which computers cannot easily match.  However, I agree the net result is that it's not really worth using scanning systems.
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