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Author Topic: Playing in octaves  (Read 2093 times)

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Baron Collins-Hill

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Playing in octaves
« on: January 04, 2016, 06:36:43 PM »

I've always loved the Quebecois One Row style/sound:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwltqwDCGKk

A big part of that sound is the lovely 4 voices of the instrument (LMMH). I don't own a one row, so I am working on learning the first tune in that video in parallel octaves on my 2 voice D/G/Acc using only the D row, which creates a LLMM sound, closer to a one row sound. My box has a scale that goes down to the D below the normal 3rd or 4th button on a standard D/G, which is helpful. The first two parts weren't too hard to get the basic idea down, but that third part is going to take a little time.

The tune is Reel Gaspe, with a third part that sounds like the A part of Moneymusk, a lovely addition in my opinion.

My question is thus: Is this a common technique? I also stumbled upon Gavin Atkin's lovely video of the tune, where he is getting even more complex by adding in chords, but that will have to be something I work on down the line:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Od8fHhyiag

Are there other videos or recording of box players playing in parallel octaves? I'd love to hear them!

Thanks,
Baron
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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2016, 06:46:09 PM »

this is a great rendition and an exercise in bellows control ;)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_3_YeG9eL4
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Graham

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gmatkin

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2016, 08:47:17 PM »

You might try this https://youtu.be/k7oujWH7WCY, this https://youtu.be/GsJMZhVrdAw and this https://youtu.be/R0QoPaPrtBo

I mix octaves with thirds on and off as it suits me and when it's convenient - which it often isn't! It seems to suit waltzes particularly though.

I like the technique because it sounds cool and boosts the weaker high notes on the right, which means I can be more generous with the left hand. I don't think it's a hugely common technique, but probably worth developing.

If you're interested, this might help: https://youtu.be/apMOE8MZ5Dc and also this https://youtu.be/6Jj_PvWhLys

Gavin
« Last Edit: January 04, 2016, 11:02:57 PM by gmatkin »
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boxcall

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2016, 08:56:59 PM »

this is a great rendition and an exercise in bellows control ;)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_3_YeG9eL4
yes good rendition , but I don't see Serge using octaves in the video. I could be missing it .

I do see it in first video. Rejean Simard seems to be blending octaves in and playing some the way Serge is playing it.

I see Gavin just posted that he mixes them in as well.

I think it adds a lot to the music !!
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george garside

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2016, 09:05:43 PM »

on the row ( and where else on a one row!)  makes playing in octaves dead easy as providing the 4 fingers are resting or hovering over 4 buttons pressing the button under the 1st and 4th finger gives an octave on the push and  moving the 1st or 4th finger out by one button gives an octave on the pull. 

If the box is firmly attached to its owner  the thumb can also be occasionaly used  in conjunction with  the first and 4th finger  to play 3 of the same note  or in conjuction with the 1st finger to play 2 the same.

george
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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2016, 09:33:27 PM »

this is a great rendition and an exercise in bellows control ;)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_3_YeG9eL4
yes good rendition , but I don't see Serge using octaves in the video.

Me neither ... it's good enough without octaves, a subtle hint that over egged puds can be a little stodgy.
(Before anyone gets their white charger out, that was NOT a comment about any of the clips posted heretofor  8) )
 
Gavin, the last two of the first 3 vids are the same...
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Lester

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2016, 09:36:10 PM »

this is a great rendition and an exercise in bellows control ;)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_3_YeG9eL4
yes good rendition , but I don't see Serge using octaves in the video.

Me neither ... it's good enough without octaves, a subtle hint that over egged puds can be a little stodgy.
(Before anyone gets their white charger out, that was NOT a comment about any of the clips posted heretofor  8) )
 
Gavin, the last two of the first 3 vids are the same...

B C-H's original query was about playing in octaves as he wanted to emulate the 4 stop sound on a 2 voice box by playing in octaves.

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2016, 09:52:13 PM »


B C-H's original query was about playing in octaves as he wanted to emulate the 4 stop sound on a 2 voice box by playing in octaves.


Yes, thanks Lester, unlike some, I do read all the contributions before posting.

I thought Serge's rendition was a good clean, clear example of the tune on a 1 row and as such, a worthy of being emulated! 

(takes me back to 1984)


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Graham

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boxcall

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2016, 10:57:36 PM »

this is a great rendition and an exercise in bellows control ;)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_3_YeG9eL4
yes good rendition , but I don't see Serge using octaves in the video.

Me neither ... it's good enough without octaves, a subtle hint that over egged puds can be a little stodgy.
(Before anyone gets their white charger out, that was NOT a comment about any of the clips posted heretofor  8) )
 
Gavin, the last two of the first 3 vids are the same...
I agree it was good enough without octaves and with the stodgy puds!  ;)
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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2016, 11:00:29 PM »

 ;D   :P
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Graham

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gmatkin

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2016, 11:01:31 PM »

Fixed. It's not something to use if it isn't going to be crisp enough. But if you practice, it's likely to get there...

Gavin

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2016, 11:29:49 PM »

There are no rules; no rights nor wrongs. If you like playing RH harmonies - octaves, thirds, fifths, etc., - that's great! Go for it. But if you prefer the clean single note melody on the RH, that's fine too.

All players have their own individual styles and RH harmonies may work better on some instruments than on others. We should celebrate our differences.  :Ph

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Frank Lee

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2016, 12:42:38 AM »

I use octaves a lot, and after some practice actually find this easier for some reason, than playing single notes.  It may be that one finger 'informs' another, whereas a single note has no reference notes (or fingers).  It's a great technique for Morris, where you're playing fairly slowly and need lots of volume.  I've never bothered damping the rather loud bass end of my Dino Baffetti, as the balance is about right when playing in octaves on the treble end.  I don't (couldn't anyway) play in octaves for faster tunes, where the melody would tend to become muddy.  As Gavin says, it's good for waltzes too, these tending to be slower.
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Psuggmog Volbenz

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Re: Playing in octaves
« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2016, 04:33:23 AM »

Octaves are very often used in cajun music on a one row 4 stop boxes which means that 8 reeds are sounding. When I trying to sound like a 2 row on my 4 stop boexes, I close two stops. It is easier than the other way 'round.
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