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Author Topic: Playandteach tune book  (Read 9047 times)

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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #60 on: July 25, 2016, 12:35:36 PM »

And here's the melodeon version of Agamemnon.
As there were no takers for why it's called Agamemnon - look at 7 mins 26 secs of this youtube epic.
Sometimes people ask if I miss my old career - and I rarely do - being surprisingly happy bodging around on instruments I have little skill at, but when I listen to these big works a little nostalgia creeps in.
Here's a few of my colleagues from the Philharmonia telling what it's like playing Strauss in a big orchestra.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2016, 12:41:41 PM by playandteach »
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Jack Campin

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #61 on: July 25, 2016, 12:51:43 PM »

For tunes set afloat in the folk/trad milieu, the composer doesn't get to control what players can manage to memorize and make a success of.  We had a discussion of William Taylor's Tabletop Hornpipe a while back - I much prefer it the way the morris dance community has adapted it.  Similarly I prefer Philippe Plard's Zelda without the third and fourth parts, and it's usually played without them.

The most extreme example I know of is Grey Larsen's Thunderhead - it's a great tune the way it's played around Edinburgh (as recorded by the Old Blind Dogs in the 1980s) but it's rubbish the way Larsen originally had it, and it was a remarkable stroke of imagination from the OBD's to see that it could be made into something listenable.
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #62 on: July 25, 2016, 04:03:07 PM »

With great thanks to those who have messaged me.
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Roger Howard

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #63 on: July 25, 2016, 04:07:51 PM »

But I'm afraid it makes me want to reconsider my use of time.

Don't do that - I'm sure there are plenty of people who like the tunes - as I do - even if they don't feel they have much that they need to say about them. I'm still trying to overcome my arthritis with Sciatica, but I'm sure I'll have a go at some others. (:)

Best wishes

Roger
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #64 on: July 25, 2016, 08:30:50 PM »

Thanks, touched by the messages. I'll grow a thicker skin.
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #65 on: July 25, 2016, 10:13:54 PM »

I've a friend whose daughter has just had a major back operation and is now home again. This is a Song for Maya.

By the way, the rhythm of the opening bar is to the words; this is a song for Maya - I'm finding that once you have an opening rhythm things tend to develop well from there. Yes, it's in A minor, and 5/4 - am I getting predictable? (Rhetorical - no answer needed).
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #66 on: July 25, 2016, 10:44:48 PM »

And here's a late night piano version.
Song For Maya
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #67 on: July 26, 2016, 06:00:58 PM »

We had someone asking about cross chording on a G/C a couple of hours ago - and although I regularly use a few combinations of basses with substitution chords, I thought I'd experiment with combining chords senza basses.
This is the result. The + signs have nothing to do with augmented chords - just trying to make it clear that there are two chords going on. 3rds out, by the way.
Sketch is called No Bass Oblige
« Last Edit: July 26, 2016, 06:11:43 PM by playandteach »
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #68 on: July 26, 2016, 09:06:40 PM »

Here's a soundcloud version of No Bass Oblige. The sound is untreated as the whole point is to hear the blend as it really is - however it is a good room to play in.
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stevejay

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #69 on: July 27, 2016, 06:47:24 PM »

This was a clever realization of the enthusiasm for the recent chord chart.

I will work through your combinations, it's good practice to expand the use of left hand chords.

Thanks
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #70 on: July 28, 2016, 03:35:52 PM »

I sensed that I was getting carried away with unusual phrase lengths, and decided to go back to basics to see if I could write a tune with a conventional structure and no syncopations etc. but still have something about it.
I've complained in the past of not wanting to play tunes where you can predict what happens next. But now I've written one myself.
It's called Vanilla March, and fits quite well under the hands.
Agamemnon started with the opening leitmotif from Elektra.
Any guesses where the first 4 notes of this tune come from?
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #71 on: July 28, 2016, 03:41:41 PM »

By the way there are also 3 other snippets of tunes hidden inside Vanilla March.
One from G and S, one from Elvis, and one that keeps marching in.
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #72 on: July 28, 2016, 06:56:18 PM »

Back to 6/8 - to avoid another 3/4 piece. Still in A minor, and fast harmonic change - but like Delicq's Chiens Battus, the B section is simpler harmonically, and in this case, an even simpler C section (where I also have a tendency to use sequences). It's one way I find helps give different character to the sections.
It's called Recycle
By the way, if anybody liked this tune, but didn't like the extra bar to the opening phrase (e.g. for dancing) you can omit bar 5 (you might want to replace the last E quaver in bar 4 with the C above it in that case).
« Last Edit: July 28, 2016, 07:48:37 PM by playandteach »
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #73 on: July 28, 2016, 11:29:39 PM »

And here's a piano version of Vanilla March - if indeed it is a march (my best guess). There are other flavours available.
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Pete Dunk

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #74 on: July 29, 2016, 12:37:40 AM »

I think you might have been ever so slightly pistachio at the time and your vignettes don't fool anyone ;)
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Squeezing in the Isle of Oxney, Kent, UK

playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #75 on: July 29, 2016, 09:46:15 AM »

There was a great trumpet player (now died - so I won't sully his name) but he was once asked how he could play so well when he was pistachioed all the time, he replied: Easy, I practise when I'm pistachioed.

He also had a reasonable complaint from the back desk of violas who sat in front of the trumpets (a real and ongoing problem with work related deafness) - asking him if he had to play so loudly even in rehearsals. He said if they'd practised harder at music college they'd be sitting at the front of the section out of harm's way.

Didn't get the vignettes bit?
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Steve_freereeder

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #76 on: July 29, 2016, 10:46:28 AM »

I sensed that I was getting carried away with unusual phrase lengths, and decided to go back to basics to see if I could write a tune with a conventional structure and no syncopations etc. but still have something about it.
I've complained in the past of not wanting to play tunes where you can predict what happens next. But now I've written one myself.
It's called Vanilla March, and fits quite well under the hands.
Agamemnon started with the opening leitmotif from Elektra.
Any guesses where the first 4 notes of this tune come from?

If you mean the Vanilla March, how about the first movement of the Tchaikovsky piano concerto?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItSJ_woWnmk
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #77 on: July 29, 2016, 11:12:43 AM »

Good guess, and as right as anything. But think clarinet!
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Steve_freereeder

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #78 on: July 29, 2016, 12:27:06 PM »

Good guess, and as right as anything. But think clarinet!

Aha! How could I not have guessed first of all?  ;)
It's the opening phrase of the Mozart clarinet quintet K581
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Gtqsm5gH24
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playandteach

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Re: Playandteach tune book
« Reply #79 on: July 29, 2016, 12:29:39 PM »

Here's a soundcloud version of Recycle

Yes, that's the one Steve. Did you spot 'The Lord High Executioner'? and 'Wooden Heart'? or 'When the Saints'. Just tiny snippets.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2016, 12:32:47 PM by playandteach »
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