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Author Topic: Machine shop safety  (Read 600 times)

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RogerT

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Machine shop safety
« on: July 17, 2017, 07:49:17 AM »

I'm not a lifelong professional user of machine shop equipment, though long long ago I spent a year at an Engineering training school, where safety was continually drummed into us.
For anyone insterested, here is a link to the HSE re machine use safety. Accidents happen so quickly and often when you are tired, or distracted, or have decided to take a short cut (no pun intended). Recently I had an accident with a plastic push stick on my circular saw. No harm to me but it was a reminder of how powerful are these machines. Diatonix pointed out how dangerous are these plastic sticks (quite right!!). It occurred to me that posting on safety might be useful.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/woodworking/woodcutting.htm
« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 08:30:12 AM by RogerT »
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Nick Collis Bird

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2017, 08:00:49 AM »

It's true Roger ,
I've been working all my life with dangerous machinery and even those without power can be just as bad like smashing your thumb in a board chopper clamp and the only person you can blame is yourself for stamping on the foot pedal. The old operators seem to be the worst, over riding safety systems because "it's easier" when I was an apprentice the sight of an old boy wandering around the workshop having just lost half a hand will stay with me forever.
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Thrupenny Bit

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2017, 09:01:11 AM »

I work in a parallel universe, having worked in laboratories all my working life and during my career have handled some extremely nasty chemicals when carrying out research.
You either do things safely, or not at all in my book.
....and even then accidents can occur.
...and an occasional close shave is a useful reminder to keep your guard up.

Glad you're ok matey.
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pete /acorn

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2017, 01:13:10 PM »

I've worked with woodwork machines all my working life and still do alongside the instrument business.I carry the scars and feel myself very lucky that I still have my fingers.

All the accident that I have had were when rushing to get out contracts or in workshop when really should have realized that I was too tired.

It is never the machines fault

Pete
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Nick Collis Bird

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2017, 02:36:02 PM »



It is never the machines fault

Pete


I know, but they lurk in the background  thinking " come on. Come on try me"  I'm working out how to bite you.
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jonm

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2017, 06:10:07 PM »

Around 20 people a year are seriously injured in sheds running machinery on 50Hz AC and using filament lamps rather than fluorescents.

Running speeds for many machines are multiples of 50Hz so can appear stationary when lit by a bulb which flickers fifty times a second.....
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pete /acorn

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2017, 07:33:01 PM »



It is never the machines fault

Pete


I know, but they lurk in the background  thinking " come on. Come on try me"  I'm working out how to bite you.

They sometimes don't bit,my 20'' diameter circular saw decided to throw a 600mm long,100x100mm piece of oak into my face.  ouch
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Anahata

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2017, 07:39:20 PM »

Around 20 people a year are seriously injured in sheds running machinery on 50Hz AC and using filament lamps rather than fluorescents.

Surely it's the fluorescents that flicker worse.
I'm putting 100% LEDs in my new house: they often run on DC (even 240V LED lamps usually generate DC internally) so no flicker at all.
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malcolmbebb

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2017, 07:47:24 PM »

...and no irritating hum...
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Theo

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2017, 08:57:59 PM »

You can still get flicker from some LEDs.  All depends on the driver circuitry.
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RogerT

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2017, 09:01:47 PM »

Well I have to say I've not noticed light flicker as a problem. The machine is normally making a loud noise when it is running, so that's a big clue.
Here are some basic safety tips:
https://www.thespruce.com/safety-rules-every-woodworker-should-know-3536833

malcolmbebb

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2017, 09:14:05 PM »

But don't rely on the loud noise. Especially when wearing ear defenders. Although they may muffle the scream.
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boxcall

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2017, 09:25:00 PM »

I've worked with woodwork machines all my working life and still do alongside the instrument business.I carry the scars and feel myself very lucky that I still have my fingers.

All the accident that I have had were when rushing to get out contracts or in workshop when really should have realized that I was too tired.

It is never the machines fault

Pete
My brother in law just lost the first two and almost three fingers, hurrying and under stress.
Set the blade to the right ht. And fence and other devises should run parallel to blade, a must to avoid most kickback , wedges , push sticks etc. I make wood push sticks with a block screwed on the end, they can be nicked by blade then replaced. I use to only used them when I was close to one inch, I tend to use them more these days like any thing less 3"
I've found you must be thinking about what your doing at all times, easier said than done.
I fell off a roof when my head wasn't in the game, the only thing I lost was my hearing from machine work (:) i wear ear protection now!!
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Kimric Smythe

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2017, 06:40:24 AM »

Man you haven't lived till you have a 8 inch disc angle grinder buck and chase it's way up your leg. It was a sort of combination of a cut and a burn.

 I do a lot of heavy industrial machine work as a hobby so I have seen some pretty insane stuff.
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Rob2Hook

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2017, 10:55:17 AM »

I had to cut a number of scaffold tubes to make a boat cradle, using an 8 inch grinder.  After a while you get the hang of letting the machine do the work and it doesn't kick as much.  Early on I had a couple bump my leg.  I was lucky and discovered in the process that cheap (hard plastic) wellington boots make the grinder bounce off without cutting - it only bruises your leg.

Rob.
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RogerT

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Re: Machine shop safety
« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2017, 08:27:12 PM »

A few years ago I was into hand planing, which includes using fingers on the foot to feel if the plane is level on, say, the edge of a door or something similar. I also have an electric plane and momentarily forgot and stuck my finger under the foot, a la hand planing, but while it was running. Luckily it only took a smallish chunk out of my finger. Realised why electric plane has two handles...to keep both hands away from the blade. Marginally less excruciating than slicing the end of my finger off on a kitchen mandoline one day when cutting spuds (kitchen Mandolines are the devils work).
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