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Author Topic: Modes/Keys  (Read 2340 times)

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Mike Hirst

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Re: Modes/Keys
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2018, 08:57:54 PM »

i gave up on trying to understand modes in the fifth form, around 1962. It's all Greek to me!  :'(

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Jesse Smith

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Re: Modes/Keys
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2018, 09:24:41 PM »

For those interested in learning more about music theory, I really liked a book called "Edly's Music Theory for Practical People". As the title implies, it's written for musicians in an accessible and not academic way. It's got lots of fun cartoons and doodles that help explain the theory.
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tiny

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Re: Modes/Keys
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2018, 11:43:37 PM »

Quote
in an accessible and not academic way.

I like that approach in all walks of life.

Would that be similar to' Music for Dummies' I wonder.
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lizzy in Hoppicking Herefordshire

Jesse Smith

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Re: Modes/Keys
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2018, 11:56:29 PM »

Quote
in an accessible and not academic way.

I like that approach in all walks of life.

Would that be similar to' Music for Dummies' I wonder.
I haven't read any specific "For Dummies" books about music, but Edly's approach is definitely geared towards regular musicians (maybe even those who don't read music) who want to learn more about the theory underlying the stuff they play. There are some sample pages online at edly.com.

I read it about ten years ago when I was pretty intensely learning to play blues on electric guitar and starting to get into some jazzier chords and progressions.
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Hohner Pokerwork D/G, Hohner one row four stop in C, Hohner Pressed Wood C/F.

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Re: Modes/Keys
« Reply #24 on: March 01, 2018, 12:01:31 AM »

Thanks I'll look it up .
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lizzy in Hoppicking Herefordshire

jack

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Re: Modes/Keys
« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2018, 10:19:55 AM »

The modes of the major scale go from bright to dark, starting with Lydian

Then flatten the (raised) fourth (F# if you’re playing C Lydian) for Ionian mode
Flatten the seventh to get Mixolydian
Flatten the third to get Dorian
Then the sixth for Aeolian
Flatten the second to get Phrygian

You can experiment with these (on a piano) by playing a drone with your left hand – an open fifth, C and G and tinkling around.
 
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Andy in Vermont

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Re: Modes/Keys
« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2018, 04:13:18 PM »

That’s an interesting way to think about the modes—how they are all modifications of the different degrees of a scale.

I tend to think about them in a different way, which is perhaps easier to experience on a diatonic accordion, even on a one row. Take a one row in D. Play the notes of the D major scale and play the same notes but from E to E, and you get the Dorian mode; A to A is mixolydian; B to B is aeolian; etc.

Then it also becomes easier to see how the “gapped” scales work as well.

The modes of the major scale go from bright to dark, starting with Lydian

Then flatten the (raised) fourth (F# if you’re playing C Lydian) for Ionian mode
Flatten the seventh to get Mixolydian
Flatten the third to get Dorian
Then the sixth for Aeolian
Flatten the second to get Phrygian

You can experiment with these (on a piano) by playing a drone with your left hand – an open fifth, C and G and tinkling around.

Chris Ryall

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Re: Modes/Keys
« Reply #27 on: March 10, 2018, 12:16:32 PM »

see https://chrisryall.net/modes/index.htm

Say you are are G "major" and decide to improvise a turn of your tune in its relative minor, that's Em, and importantly Em with a natural C, keeping with your "G" set of notes.

I might start by moving from G chord: GBD, to Gmaj7: GBDF#, then take finger off G to get Bm. That is a modal (so weak) dominant into my targeted E scale. From there I could play into lower octave, or upper. So "up" v "down" has little meaning. The modes run in a circle.

Or more dramatic, just shift from G to Em abruptly. A lot of Irish tunes do this.

Or "emphatic" play the push B major chord, available on many DGaccs setups. This is to modulate into E :o specifically, forcefully, but … could be EMaj on a different instrument. I'd simply carry on in Em using all those G scale notes as before … having made my wake up call.

All of this apart from the B chord stays in the modes of G, the transition a matter of style. Practically … borrow any note you like or need from your D row (except C#)! "playing in chords" as you change mode is another good way to emphasis mode, be that upward or downward shift. As exemplified in 1st examplar
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