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Author Topic: Why do they do that?  (Read 2916 times)

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tirpous

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #40 on: April 26, 2018, 01:26:48 PM »

Another option is to use straps without buckles near the ends, such as the NeoTech line carried by The Button Box (http://www.buttonbox.com/accessories.html#straps

'Why do they do that?' could also refer to strap makers/designers who use agressive metal fittings near the end of their products ...
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C K LIGHT

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #41 on: April 26, 2018, 01:27:12 PM »

Can't understand it myself. I mean I am very attached to my c. 1875 fiddle which has suffered numerous cracks and repairs and has an indelible blackish stain from where previous players' hands pressed against the top bout when playing in higher positions. It bears all these marks with grace, as badges of honour. They were acquired honestly!


I think most would agree that these time-earned marks can add character to an older instrument. I think it's a big difference to a relatively new instrument that has become badly scratched due to poor design of straps or general lack of care when handling.
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Winston Smith

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #42 on: April 26, 2018, 01:29:56 PM »

Although I'm reading this thread with interest, I keep expecting to see Graham Chapman, in full military uniform, barging on stage saying,"Right, that's enough, this is getting too silly!"

It would be lovely if everyone could have a really pristine instrument. But....where would that leave those aspiring players who are financially challenged? I'd hate to see melodeon playing/collecting go the same way as the classic car and/or off road motoring scene, where they have increasingly become the playthings/playgrounds of those with money to burn. (See the Briggs result, or the prices of Series 1 Land Rovers, on eBay?)

Whatever you think of your melodeon (even if it's a substitute for having children!) surely it's only a melodeon if it gets played and enjoyed (with the distinct possibility of sustaining damage of some sort) otherwise, it's just a lovely looking ornamental instrument, which is a different thing altogether?

Of course, buckles wouldn't damage the instrument and therefore buckle covers wouldn't be required, if one played with only the thumb strap, just saying!
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Chris Rayner

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #43 on: April 26, 2018, 02:20:29 PM »

I was given a handy tip in Wensleydale.  Basketball finger protectors.  These are made of a kind of elastic bandage material, and are available from various ebay suppliers at six quid for ten.  I’ve just fitted some to my nice new (to me) Tommy.  Mostly they’re black, but I got beige, they blend in quite nicely.
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Elderly amateur musician hoping to stave off dementia by learning to play the melodeon.  Just upgraded to a Tommy, also rather breathless G/C pokerwork and a G/C Benny.  Oh! And single row 2 stop Hohner in need of serious leak proofing.

melodeon

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #44 on: April 26, 2018, 02:42:04 PM »

In reference to violins, I also find the act of artificial antiquing to be "an affectation".  I do not care for it.
Full disclosure, in another life I was a violin collector and hustler. My wife is a fine player, I do not play. I also collected bows, strangely, (and thankfully) I see no such trend to artificially antique bows.

Wear with age, not abuse with age, is my preference.

PS: Contrarily, I produce items which I antique.  The reason?  That which I make is not modern and would look ridiculous if it was perfect/mint.
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Grape Ape

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #45 on: April 26, 2018, 09:42:58 PM »

For the record I treat my boxes very well and they rarely leave the house- I have old ones i bring camping etc. with the better ones enjoying all the comforts and care I can provide.  The Gaillard was fine until I lengthened the bottom straps- you see I am not growing thinner as I pass through middle age...  Now I am very careful to check where the bottom strap buckles lay, and if extra space is needed only loosen the top buckles. I find if the bottom brackets are adjusted properly the buckles do not rub against the boxes at all, so no real need for buckle protectors, but might buy or make some just the same.
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playandteach

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #46 on: April 26, 2018, 11:51:22 PM »

The only new instrument I've bought arrived with buckle rash as the packer had left the straps on unprotected. Several years later those are still the only dings. I do, though think there are good reasons to age violins. Many trumpet players also wreck their mutes to improve tone, and sax players have for years partially stripped varnish for tonal reasons. I wouldn't refuse a better playing instrument for a cosmetically perfect version. 20 years ago I had a clarinet barrel crack on stage while tuning up - it went with a bang. I quickly bunged some superglue in the crack (Royal Festival Hall concert) and it remains that way today, because repairing it more permanently with pins might stress the wood.
I think the main objection would be if the wear wasn't owned up to before the sale by photos or description.
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Grape Ape

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BbEb Saphir, BbEb Hohner III BS, CF Ouveture V,  Dick Richards Pointe Noire (in A of all things), CF Preciosa, AD Presswood, CF Club Model II, Melodija Menges GCFBb, Preciosa BbEb, Handry GCF, Corona iiir GCF, GC Pokerwork, a plethera of vintage Melodicas, and probably a couple I forgot

Winston Smith

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #48 on: April 27, 2018, 06:03:41 AM »

Grape, you'll be giving them heart attacks with pictures like that first thing in the morning!
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Mike-T

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #49 on: April 27, 2018, 08:51:11 AM »

Judging by the amount of water on the table in pic 3 he probably gave it a wash as well?

Mike.
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Steve C.

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #50 on: April 27, 2018, 01:26:54 PM »

In my ignorance, having bought my first box, I did not know what that green plush "flap" inside was for. 
When I put my Tommy in the case for the very first time, laying the straps carefully across the buttons, then placing the flap on top, getting ready to close the case, someone said, what the hell are you doing? 
My answer:  what they hell am I doing about what?
 :P
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Robin Tims

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #51 on: June 01, 2018, 04:51:46 PM »

For fairly permanently fitted and adjusted straps I find the judicious use of heat shrink tubing over buckles etc works well.
Available in various colours and diameters in lengths of about 30 cms only a modicum of gentle heat from a small heat gun or hairdryer is required to fit.

Rob

Like this..... (putting money where my mouth is !). Sadly I only had that dark colour around today.

Rob
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Steve_freereeder

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #52 on: June 01, 2018, 06:44:25 PM »

For fairly permanently fitted and adjusted straps I find the judicious use of heat shrink tubing over buckles etc works well.
Available in various colours and diameters in lengths of about 30 cms only a modicum of gentle heat from a small heat gun or hairdryer is required to fit.
Like this..... (putting money where my mouth is !). Sadly I only had that dark colour around today.
Looks neat and I'm sure it works a treat, but my personal preference would be for something less permanent. When I'm working on the reeds in the treble end, unless it's just a minor tuning adjustment, I always remove the straps otherwise they tend to get caught on things and generally just get in the way on the tuning bellows.
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Robin Tims

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #53 on: June 01, 2018, 07:05:56 PM »

Yes, fair point Steve and I did wonder about that. It is shortly due to go to Martyn White for some attention so we shall see what he says.

Rob
« Last Edit: June 01, 2018, 08:35:10 PM by Robin Tims »
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John MacKenzie (Cugiok)

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #54 on: June 04, 2018, 11:56:13 AM »

Best thing I saw was where someone had cut about an inch off a piece of three inch wide black elastic from a fabric shop, doubled it over, sewed the edges together, turned it inside out. Then they undid the strap, slid the tube over it, fastened it up again, and slid the elasticated tube, down over the buckle. easy to make easy to move, easy to replace.

Sir John
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Steve C.

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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #55 on: June 04, 2018, 12:44:31 PM »

Lots of nice delrin buckles and fittings out there, but hard to find a style that suits thick leather trad straps...
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Re: Why do they do that?
« Reply #56 on: June 04, 2018, 02:02:38 PM »

Best thing I saw was where someone had cut about an inch off a piece of three inch wide black elastic from a fabric shop, doubled it over, sewed the edges together, turned it inside out. Then they undid the strap, slid the tube over it, fastened it up again, and slid the elasticated tube, down over the buckle. easy to make easy to move, easy to replace.

Sir John
That's exactly the sort of protector that Bernard Loffet supplied with my 2.5 Pro. To make more for my other instruments, I found some very wide, ribbed elastic, such as you describe (the sort that is, or was, used for nurses' belts) and made them up that way.
I had so much fun making them that I got some more elastic and made up several two-tone models.

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