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Author Topic: Transcribing unfamiliar symbols into ABC  (Read 388 times)

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Roger Hare

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Transcribing unfamiliar symbols into ABC
« on: April 29, 2019, 06:56:47 PM »

Can any kind person tell me what is the ABC equivalent of the two symbols below the music in the
attached illustration?

In the first line, there is what looks like an 'So' below the opening F, and in the third line, there is
what looks like an 'Sy' below the E in the second bar.

I thought I had already sussed these out, but can't find any reference in my notes to myself.  :(

Thank you.

Roger

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Steve_freereeder

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Re: Transcribing unfamiliar symbols into ABC
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2019, 07:38:57 PM »

I think the 'So' is an abbreviation for 'Solo', i.e. one instrument playing, and 'Sy' for 'Symphony', meaning in this context, all other instruments; the equivalent of the modern day 'tutti'.

I don't think there is a dedicated ABC code other than inserting a text string in the usual way in double quotes: "Solo" and "Symphony".
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Roger Hare

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Re: Transcribing unfamiliar symbols into ABC
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2019, 05:27:49 AM »

I think the 'So' is an abbreviation for 'Solo', i.e. one instrument playing, and 'Sy' for 'Symphony', meaning in this context, all other instruments; the equivalent of the modern day 'tutti'.

I don't think there is a dedicated ABC code other than inserting a text string in the usual way in double quotes: "Solo" and "Symphony".
That does it for me - I did wonder if it was some weird form of 'turn' (though the 'S' is reversed and angled in 'turn').

Thank you very much!

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Roger Hare

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Re: Transcribing unfamiliar symbols into ABC
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2019, 12:47:56 PM »

Sorry folks, another couple:

The first one looks a little like a '7'. I don't think it is a trill as the writer uses 'tr' elsewhere in the MS. I don't
think it is a rest as it is below the music?

The second one (the 'S' above the music) looks like segno, but I'm not absolutely sure. I've also an example of
this one without the diagonal stroke.

Again, I thought I had seen these explained, but can't find the explanation now.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 12:58:05 PM by Roger Hare »
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Re: Transcribing unfamiliar symbols into ABC
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2019, 01:12:43 PM »

Sorry folks, another couple:

The first one looks a little like a '7'. I don't think it is a trill as the writer uses 'tr' elsewhere in the MS. I don't
think it is a rest as it is below the music?

It's a quaver rest. Your screen shot does not really show enough to put it in full context, but you can see that there is a crotchet with a downward stem on the first of the group of three quavers. This indicates that there is a harmony or second/alternative part. The quaver rest is there to make up the beat following the preceding crotchet.

Quote
The second one (the 'S' above the music) looks like segno, but I'm not absolutely sure. I've also an example of
this one without the diagonal stroke.

Yes - it's a segno sign. The double repeat dots confirm this. Somewhere in the music there will be an instruction to repeat either to, or from, that segno sign.
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Roger Hare

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Re: Transcribing unfamiliar symbols into ABC
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2019, 01:58:38 PM »

1. It's a quaver rest. Your screen shot does not really show enough to put it in full context, but you can see that there is a crotchet with a downward stem on the first of the group of three quavers. This indicates that there is a harmony or second/alternative part. The quaver rest is there to make up the beat following the preceding crotchet.

2. Yes - it's a segno sign. The double repeat dots confirm this. Somewhere in the music there will be an instruction to repeat either to, or from, that segno sign.
1. Thanks. That makes a little more sense now - elsewhere in the same tune there is another example,
where the rest is definitely 'in' rather than 'below' the music. I did wonder if it was something to do with
a voice overlay. I think I can see how to get it to look/play 'right'. Gor! we learn something new every day!

2. Thanks. I missed the second segno (it's on the following page!!!).
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