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Author Topic: Bass lines typical minor tunes  (Read 1296 times)

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Anahata

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Re: Bass lines typical minor tunes
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2019, 04:14:27 PM »

Cmaj7 - a powerful weapon that should only be entrusted to responsible adults...
(My Oakwood needed a lot of air to do that run, just tried it)
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Dick Rees

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Re: Bass lines typical minor tunes
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2019, 06:15:52 PM »

Cmaj7 - a powerful weapon that should only be entrusted to responsible adults...
(My Oakwood needed a lot of air to do that run, just tried it)

Adding in the suggested e f# b RH triad you end up with a nominal Cmaj7b5.  The inclusion of both the g (from the LH e minor chord) and f# (in the RH triad) is a bit of an anomaly, but if you've a "no thirds"  LH it's strictly legit.
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Chris Ryall

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Re: Bass lines typical minor tunes
« Reply #22 on: April 24, 2019, 10:51:51 AM »

There's always a taker ...  ;)

[theory]
1. Maj7 chord is no 'scary' thing. It is simply notes 1,3,5,7 from the major scale.  Chord iii
    is  minor so I think of it as simply … Em chord laid onto a different base. You can  express
   that as a 'cross chord' on the left end (Em / C bass) or play the easy Em on the right
   (D row pull E,G,B) against left bass, or even the right pull C ( DrowE,G,BGrowC).
   It all depends what the rest of the tune  is doing.  Practice all 3 … you can pop it in at will

    The 'devil' is in the using of it. As an extended chord it has a jazz feel and can fight folk tunes a bit.
    Be sparse about that. It harmonises (obviously!) as either C or Em so can be easy lubrication whenever
    your tunes runs against C=>Em or Em=>C  (:)  Essentially playing CMaj7 right through … works

2.  I got the Em9/C trick from Stéph Milleret when I had a week with him, few years back. Dick is spot
     on with his analysis, but Stéph calls it CMaj7#13 recognising that the F# throws into 2nd
     octave, conventionally continuing our note numbering 1,3,5,7…11,13,15 'right through'.  That seems to
     be the way it's done now ... Wagner's "Tristan" chord (also trivial on melodeon  ;)) is looked at in these
     terms.  NB had we played F# in lower octave it would clash horribly with the C.  Played 18 semitones
     apart …  well it feels like tears to me  :'(   NB2: this is 2-row stuff. Not an accidental in sight  ;)
[/theory]

[practice]
  I'm presently working up Harry Robinson's "Little Pot Stove" for box, following Nic Jones' lead in using
  mainly sus chords for cadence.  Also Nic's (incredible, inimiatable!) swing.  Extending the chord in this
  way is just perfect as if you pull the lyric forward or backward … it still harmonises. (See Cmaj7 above)

  The chorus is … all about ice and misery?  So I extend my C chord =>maj7 and just 'touch in' a brief
  F# with my (Rt) little finger -  otherwise idle.  Timing against the song is … subtle and I only started
  this experiment this morning. So far so good. 
[practice]

Back to topic … I suggest the 5 note chord simply as a variation, and … just the once.  But it is a natural, and fairly easy extend to what Liam is doing.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2019, 10:55:19 AM by Chris Ryall »
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